The impact of young age on cancer-specific and non-cancer-related survival after surgery for colorectal cancer: 10-year follow-up

McMillan, D.C. and McArdle, C.S. (2009) The impact of young age on cancer-specific and non-cancer-related survival after surgery for colorectal cancer: 10-year follow-up. British Journal of Cancer, 101, pp. 557-560. (doi:10.1038/sj.bjc.6605222)

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Publisher's URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.bjc.6605222

Abstract

<b>Background</b>: It has been reported that although young patients present with more advanced disease, when adjusted for stage, cancer-specific survival is not different after surgery for colorectal cancer. However, few studies have examined non-cancer survival in young patients and 10-year survival has rarely been reported. Moreover, the largest study included patients of old age as a comparator. The aim of this study was to compare cancer-specific and non-cancer-related survival at 10 years in a young age cohort and a middle age cohort in patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer. <b>Methods</b>: Two thousand and seventy seven patients who underwent surgery for colorectal cancer between 1991 and 1994 in 11 hospitals in Scotland were included in the study. Ten-year cancer-specific and non-cancer-related survival and the hazard ratios (HR) were calculated according to age groups (<45/45–54/55–64/65–74 years). <b>Results</b>: On follow-up, 1066 patients died of their cancer and 369 died of non-cancer-related causes. At 10 years, overall survival was 32%, cancer-specific was 45%, and non-cancer-related survival was 72%. On multivariate analysis of all factors, sex (HR 0.77, 95% CI 0.68–0.88, P<0.001), mode of presentation (HR 1.64, 95% CI 1.44–1.87, P<0.01), Dukes' stage (HR 2.69, 95% CI 2.49–2.90, P<0.001), and specialisation (HR 1.24, 95% CI 1.04–1.44, P<0.01) were independently associated with cancer-specific survival. On multivariate analysis of all factors, age (HR 2.46, 2.04–2.97, P<0.001), sex (HR 0.56, 0.45–0.70, P<0.001), and deprivation (HR 1.16, 1.10–1.24, P<0.001) were independently associated with non-cancer-related survival. <b>Conclusion</b>: The results of this study confirm that young age does not have a negative impact on cancer-specific survival. Moreover, they show that, with 10-year follow-up, young age does not have a negative impact on non-cancer-related survival.

Item Type:Articles
Keywords:colorectal cancer, age, elective, curative surgery, survival
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:McMillan, Professor Donald
Authors: McMillan, D.C., and McArdle, C.S.
Subjects:R Medicine > RD Surgery
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing > Clinical Specialities
Journal Name:British Journal of Cancer
ISSN:0007-0920

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