How do features of dressage arenas influence training surface properties which are potentially associated with lameness?

Murray, R.C., Walters, J., Snart, H., Dyson, S. and Parkin, T. (2010) How do features of dressage arenas influence training surface properties which are potentially associated with lameness? Veterinary Journal, 186(2), pp. 172-179. (doi:10.1016/j.tvjl.2010.04.026)

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Abstract

Results from a previous study indicated that there are specific arena surface characteristics that are associated with an increased likelihood of lameness in dressage horses. It is important to understand what modifiable arena factors lead to these detrimental surface characteristics. The aim of this study was to describe the use of training surfaces and arenas for United Kingdom dressage horses and to investigate any relationships between arena/surface variables and detrimental surface characteristics. Data from a questionnaire returned by 22.5% of all 11,363 registered members of British Dressage were used for the study. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression models were developed with each of the previously identified surface characteristics as dependent variables. Respondents reported that the majority of arenas were privately owned, sized 20 × 40 m and had a sand and rubber surface. The results indicated that wax-coated and sand and rubber surfaces were associated with less detrimental surface properties than sand, sand and PVC, woodchips or grass. Woodchips were most strongly associated with the detrimental characteristic of slipping, and sand with tripping. The findings indicated that any arena surface should have a base, with limestone the recommended surface, and that crushed concrete was best avoided. This information supported previous studies in racehorses that indicated that surface maintenance is essential, especially when many horses are using an arena daily. Problems were less likely if an arena was privately owned.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Parkin, Professor Timothy
Authors: Murray, R.C., Walters, J., Snart, H., Dyson, S., and Parkin, T.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Veterinary Medicine
Journal Name:Veterinary Journal
Publisher:Elsevier Ltd
ISSN:1090-0233
ISSN (Online):1532-2971
Published Online:02 October 2010

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