Breath ethane peaks during a single haemodialysis session and is associated with time on dialysis

Stevenson, K.S., Radhakrishnan, K., Patterson, C.S., McMillan, L.C., Skeldon, K.D., Buist, L., Padgett, M. and Shiels, P.G. (2008) Breath ethane peaks during a single haemodialysis session and is associated with time on dialysis. Journal of Breath Research, 2(2), 026004. (doi:10.1088/1752-7155/2/2/026004)

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Abstract

There is growing evidence that oxidative stress is increased in haemodialysis patients and that dialysis per se is a contributory factor. The elevated oxidant stress, a result of increased production of reactive oxidant species (ROS), may be due to increased pro-inflammatory activity and reduced antioxidant mechanisms. ROS are transitory molecules and therefore surrogate markers of oxidant damage are required. Identification of potential causes of oxidative damage such as dialyser membranes or dialysate has been proposed and therefore assessment of oxidative damage during a single dialysis session would be of interest. We have used breath ethane, a widely accepted marker of oxidative stress, to investigate the cause and extent of the resulting oxidative damage during single dialysis sessions. Our study involved assessment of breath ethane levels during haemodialysis in an end-stage renal failure haemodialysis population (n = 24). Breath samples were collected using discrete sampling techniques and were subsequently analysed using laser spectroscopy. Each patient adopted the role of longitudinal control in this study and his or her breath ethane level was monitored regularly during the dialysis session. Significant breath ethane elevation was observed at the beginning (within the first 10 min) of each dialysis session. This paper provides an in-depth statistical analysis and clinical discussion of the recent findings. A regression analysis of the collected breath ethane data showed a trend towards increased ethane levels for patients on dialysis for a shorter duration of time (r = 0.656, R-Sq = 43.3%, p = 0.001). Multiple linear regression was undertaken to further assess these associations and revealed that peak ethane levels were significantly and independently associated with time period on dialysis (p < 0.000), vascular access (p = 0.013) and male sex (p = 0.005). However, whilst diabetes status had demonstrated a correlation with peak ethane levels (0.525, p = 0.008) this was not independent of vascular access status. This multivariate linear model was significantly associated with Ln peak ethane levels (S = 0.744, R-Sq = 80.8%). The observed rapid rise in oxidative stress during the first few minutes after commencement of dialysis gives new insight into the dynamics of the oxidative damage resulting from dialysis treatment.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Padgett, Professor Miles and Shiels, Professor Paul
Authors: Stevenson, K.S., Radhakrishnan, K., Patterson, C.S., McMillan, L.C., Skeldon, K.D., Buist, L., Padgett, M., and Shiels, P.G.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Cancer Sciences
Journal Name:Journal of Breath Research
Publisher:Institute of Physics Publishing Ltd.
ISSN:1752-7155
ISSN (Online):1752-7163
Published Online:22 April 2008

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