Infant feeding attitudes and knowledge among socioeconomically disadvantaged women in Glasgow

Dungy, C.I., McInnes, R.J., Tappin, D.M. , Wallis, A.B. and Oprescu, F. (2008) Infant feeding attitudes and knowledge among socioeconomically disadvantaged women in Glasgow. Maternal and Child Health Journal, 12(3), pp. 313-322. (doi:10.1007/s10995-007-0253-9)

Full text not currently available from Enlighten.

Publisher's URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10995-007-0253-9

Abstract

Objectives This study: (1) investigated infant feeding attitudes and knowledge among socioeconomically disadvantaged mothers in an urban community with historically low breastfeeding rates, (2) examined the influence of women's social networks on infant feeding attitudes and decisions, and (3) validated a measure of infant feeding attitudes and knowledge in this population (Iowa Infant Feeding Attitude Scale, IIFAS). Methods Women attending a prenatal clinic (n = 49) reported on: (1) demographics, (2) infant feeding attitudes and knowledge (IIFAS), (3) feeding intent, (4) opinions about breastfeeding in public, and (5) social networks. Feeding method at discharge was abstracted from hospital charts. Social network members (n = 47) identified by the prenatal sample completed interviews covering: (1) demographics, (2) infant feeding attitudes and knowledge (IIFAS), (3) prior infant feeding methods and recommendations, and (4) opinions about breastfeeding in public. Results Mean IIFAS scores were low in both groups, indicating neutral to negative breastfeeding attitudes; mothers' scores were lower than social network members. Higher maternal IIFAS score was significantly associated with intended and actual breastfeeding. A social network positive towards breastfeeding was significantly associated with mothers' positive attitude towards breastfeeding. Both mothers and social network members support breastfeeding in public. IIFAS internal consistency was robust for both mothers and social network members. Predictive validity was demonstrated by significant positive association between score and intended and actual feeding methods. Conclusions Knowledge and attitude predict breastfeeding initiation in this population. Social network members may influence mothers' feeding choices. This research is important because attitudes and knowledge derived from the IIFAS can be used to develop and evaluate breastfeeding promotion programs.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Tappin, Professor David
Authors: Dungy, C.I., McInnes, R.J., Tappin, D.M., Wallis, A.B., and Oprescu, F.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing > Clinical Specialities
Journal Name:Maternal and Child Health Journal
ISSN:1092-7875
Published Online:10 August 2007

University Staff: Request a correction | Enlighten Editors: Update this record