Usable gestures for mobile interfaces: evaluating social acceptability

Rico, J. and Brewster, S.A. (2010) Usable gestures for mobile interfaces: evaluating social acceptability. In: Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Atlanta, Georgia, USA, 10-15 Apr 2010. ACM New York: New York, NY, USA, pp. 887-896. ISBN 9781605589299 (doi:10.1145/1753326.1753458)

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Publisher's URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1753326.1753458

Abstract

Gesture-based mobile interfaces require users to change the way they use technology in public settings. Since mobile phones are part of our public appearance, designers must integrate gestures that users perceive as acceptable for public use. This topic has received little attention in the literature so far. The studies described in this paper begin to look at the social acceptability of a set of gestures with respect to location and audience in order to investigate possible ways of measuring social acceptability. The results of the initial survey showed that location and audience had a significant impact on a user's willingness to perform gestures. These results were further examined through a user study where participants were asked to perform gestures in different settings (including a busy street) over repeated trials. The results of this work provide gesture design recommendations as well as social acceptability evaluation guidelines.

Item Type:Book Sections
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Williamson, Dr Julie and Brewster, Professor Stephen
Authors: Rico, J., and Brewster, S.A.
College/School:College of Science and Engineering > School of Computing Science
Publisher:ACM New York
ISBN:9781605589299

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
457653GAIME-gestural and audio interactions for mobile environmentsStephen BrewsterEngineering & Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC)EP/F023405/1Computing Science