Aerobic capacity-dependent differences in cardiac gene expression

Bye, A., Langaas, M., Høydal, M.A., Kemi, O.J., Heinrich, G., Koch, L.G., Britton, S.L., Najjar, S.M., Ellingsen, O. and Wisløff, U. (2008) Aerobic capacity-dependent differences in cardiac gene expression. Physiological Genomics, 33, pp. 100-109. (doi:10.1152/physiolgenomics.00269.2007)

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Publisher's URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1152/physiolgenomics.00269.2007

Abstract

Aerobic capacity is a strong predictor of cardiovascular mortality. To determine the relationship between inborn aerobic capacity and cardiac gene expression we examined genome-wide gene expression in hearts of rats artificially selected for high- and low running capacity (HCR and LCR, respectively) over 16 generations. The artificial selection of LCR caused accumulation of risk factors of cardiovascular disease similar to the metabolic syndrome seen in man, whereas HCR had markedly better cardiac function. We also studied alterations in gene expression in response to exercise training in these animals. Left ventricle gene expression of both sedentary and exercise trained HCR and LCR was characterized by microarray- and gene ontology analysis. Out of 28000 screened genes, 1540 were differentially expressed between sedentary HCR and LCR. Only one gene was found differentially expressed by exercise training, but this gene had unknown name and function. Sedentary HCR expressed higher amounts of genes involved in lipid metabolism, whereas sedentary LCR expressed higher amounts of the genes involved in glucose metabolism. This suggests a switch in cardiac energy substrate utilisation from normal mitochondrial fatty acid {beta}-oxidation in HCR to carbohydrate metabolism in LCR, an event that often occurs in diseased hearts. LCR were also associated with pathological growth signaling and cellular stress. Hypoxic conditions seemed to be a common source for several of these observations, triggering hypoxia-induced alterations of transcription. In conclusion, inborn high- versus low aerobic capacity was associated with differences in cardiac energy substrate, growth signalling and cellular stress

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Kemi, Dr Ole
Authors: Bye, A., Langaas, M., Høydal, M.A., Kemi, O.J., Heinrich, G., Koch, L.G., Britton, S.L., Najjar, S.M., Ellingsen, O., and Wisløff, U.
Subjects:Q Science > QP Physiology
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences
Journal Name:Physiological Genomics
ISSN:1094-8341
ISSN (Online):1531-2267

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