Energy replacement attenuates the effects of prior moderate exercise on postprandial metabolism in overweight/obese men

Burton, F.L., Malkova, D. , Caslake, M.J. and Gill, J.M.R. (2008) Energy replacement attenuates the effects of prior moderate exercise on postprandial metabolism in overweight/obese men. International Journal of Obesity, 32(3), pp. 481-489. (doi:10.1038/sj.ijo.0803754)

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Publisher's URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.ijo.0803754

Abstract

<i>Background</i>: The extent to which exercise-induced changes to postprandial metabolism are dependant on the associated energy deficit is not known. <i>Objective</i>: To determine the effects of exercise, with and without energy replacement, on postprandial metabolism. <i>Design</i>: Each subject underwent three 2-day trials in random order. On day 1 of each trial subjects rested (control), walked at 50% maximal oxygen uptake to induce a net energy expenditure of 27 kJ kg(-1) body mass (energy-deficit) or completed the same walk with the net energy expended replaced (energy-replacement). On day 2 subjects completed an 8.5-h metabolic assessment. For 3 days prior to day 2, subjects consumed an isocaloric diet, avoided planned exercise (apart from exercise interventions) and alcohol. <i>Subjects</i>: A total of 13 overweight/obese men (age: 40 +/- 8 years, body mass index: 31.1 +/- 3.0 kg m(-2)). <i>Measurements</i>: Postprandial triglyceride, insulin, glucose, non-esterified fatty acid and 3-hydroxybutyrate concentrations and substrate utilization rates were determined. <i>Results</i>: Energy-deficit lowered postprandial triglyceride concentrations by 14 and 10% compared with control and energy-replacement (P lt 0.05 for both). Energy-deficit increased postprandial 3-hydroxybutyrate concentrations by 40 and 19% compared with control and energy-replacement (P lt 0.05 for both). Postprandial insulin concentrations were 18 and 10% lower for energy-deficit and energy-replacement compared with control and 10% lower for energy-deficit than energy-replacement (P lt 0.05 for all). Postprandial fat oxidation increased by 30 and 14% for energy-deficit and energy-replacement compared to control and was 12% higher for energy-deficit than energy-replacement (P lt 0.05 for all). <i>Conclusion</i>: Exercise with energy replacement lowered postprandial insulinaemia and increased fat oxidation. However an exercise-induced energy deficit augmented these effects and was necessary to lower postprandial lipaemia.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Malkova, Dr Dale and Gill, Professor Jason and Caslake, Professor Muriel and Burton, Dr Francis
Authors: Burton, F.L., Malkova, D., Caslake, M.J., and Gill, J.M.R.
Subjects:R Medicine > RC Internal medicine
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing > Clinical Specialities
Journal Name:International Journal of Obesity
ISSN:0307-0565

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