A socio-institutionalist critique of the 1990s' reforms of the UK's national health service

McMaster, R. (2002) A socio-institutionalist critique of the 1990s' reforms of the UK's national health service. Review of Social Economy, 60(3), pp. 403-433. (doi:10.1080/0034676021000013386)

Full text not currently available from Enlighten.

Abstract

This paper argues that the on-going reforms to the UK's National Health Service initiated in the 1990s represent potentially profound institutional change to the values underpinning the process of care. The market-orientation of the reforms is highlighted, and it is asserted that the theoretical rationale for this is informed by the nascent neoclassical health economics and new institutionalist literatures, which exhibit utilitarian propensities in that both stress outcomes and at best relegate process. Drawing from the seminal contribution of Thorstein Veblen, the paper argues that market-oriented reform in the UK may induce a shift from a Hippocratic ethos to a more individualistic value system.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:McMaster, Professor Robert
Authors: McMaster, R.
Subjects:R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
College/School:College of Social Sciences > Adam Smith Business School > Management
Journal Name:Review of Social Economy
ISSN:0034-6764
ISSN (Online):1470-1162

University Staff: Request a correction | Enlighten Editors: Update this record