Selective migration and area deprivation: evidence from 2001 Census migration data for England and Scotland

Bailey, N. and Livingston, M. (2008) Selective migration and area deprivation: evidence from 2001 Census migration data for England and Scotland. Urban Studies, 45(4), pp. 943-961. (doi:10.1177/0042098007088475)

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Abstract

Selective migration flows are thought to be a key means by which the intended benefits of area-based initiatives `leak out' of target areas, undermining their effectiveness. To date, direct evidence on the scale or impact of these flows has been weak since they are difficult to assess using survey methods. Using 2001 census data for England and Scotland, this paper looks at the scale and composition of flows for deprived neighbourhoods with a particular focus on educational attainment. It analyses the impacts of these flows on the characteristics of deprived areas, exploring differences between regions and comparing neighbourhoods involved in two major regeneration programmes with other deprived areas. The paper shows that selective migration flows do serve to reinforce spatial segregation but that the scale of this effect appears very modest and that impacts vary between regions. Flows for the regeneration areas are less adverse than for similarly deprived neighbourhoods.

Item Type:Articles
Keywords:deprivation, migration, Scotland,
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Bailey, Professor Nick and Livingston, Dr Mark
Authors: Bailey, N., and Livingston, M.
College/School:College of Social Sciences > School of Social and Political Sciences > Urban Studies
Journal Name:Urban Studies
ISSN:0042-0980
ISSN (Online):1360-063X

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