Early emergence of ethnic differences in type 2 diabetes precursors in the UK: the Child Heart and Health Study in England (CHASE Study)

Whincup, P.H., Nightingale, C.M., Owen, C.G., Rudnicka, A.R., Gibb, I., McKay, C.M., Donin, A.S., Sattar, N. , Alberti, K.G.M.M. and Cook, D.G. (2010) Early emergence of ethnic differences in type 2 diabetes precursors in the UK: the Child Heart and Health Study in England (CHASE Study). PLoS Medicine, 7(4), e1000263. (doi: 10.1371/journal.pmed.1000263)

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Abstract

<p><b>Background:</b> Adults of South Asian origin living in the United Kingdom have high risks of type 2 diabetes and central obesity; raised circulating insulin, triglyceride, and C-reactive protein concentrations; and low HDL-cholesterol when compared with white Europeans. Adults of African-Caribbean origin living in the UK have smaller increases in type 2 diabetes risk, raised circulating insulin and HDL-cholesterol, and low triglyceride and C-reactive protein concentrations. We examined whether corresponding ethnic differences were apparent in childhood.</p> <p><b>Methods and Findings:</b> We performed a cross-sectional survey of 4,796 children aged 9-10 y in three UK cities who had anthropometric measurements (68% response) and provided blood samples (58% response); ethnicity was based on parental definition. In age-adjusted comparisons with white Europeans (n = 1,153), South Asian children (n = 1,306) had higher glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) (% difference: 2.1, 95% CI 1.6 to 2.7), fasting insulin (% difference 30.0, 95% CI 23.4 to 36.9), triglyceride (% difference 12.9, 95% CI 9.4 to 16.5), and C-reactive protein (% difference 43.3, 95% CI 28.6 to 59.7), and lower HDL-cholesterol (% difference 22.9, 95% CI -4.5 to -1.3). Higher adiposity levels among South Asians (based on skinfolds and bioimpedance) did not account for these patterns. Black African-Caribbean children (n = 1,215) had higher levels of HbA1c, insulin, and C-reactive protein than white Europeans, though the ethnic differences were not as marked as in South Asians. Black African-Caribbean children had higher HDL-cholesterol and lower triglyceride levels than white Europeans; adiposity markers were not increased.</p> <p><b>Conclusions:</b> Ethnic differences in type 2 diabetes precursors, mostly following adult patterns, are apparent in UK children in the first decade. Some key determinants operate before adult life and may provide scope for early prevention.</p>

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Sattar, Professor Naveed
Authors: Whincup, P.H., Nightingale, C.M., Owen, C.G., Rudnicka, A.R., Gibb, I., McKay, C.M., Donin, A.S., Sattar, N., Alberti, K.G.M.M., and Cook, D.G.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences
Journal Name:PLoS Medicine
Publisher:Public Library of Science
ISSN:1549-1277
ISSN (Online):1549-1676
Published Online:20 April 2010
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2010 The Authors
First Published:First published in PLoS Medicine 7(4):e1000263
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher

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