Oncolytic gene therapy for canine cancers: teaching old dog viruses new tricks

Arendt, M., Nasir, L. and Morgan, I.M. (2009) Oncolytic gene therapy for canine cancers: teaching old dog viruses new tricks. Veterinary and Comparative Oncology, 7(3), pp. 153-161. (doi:10.1111/j.1476-5829.2009.00187.x)

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Abstract

The use of viruses to treat cancer has been studied for decades. With the advancement of molecular biology, viruses have been modified and genetically engineered to optimize their ability to target cancer cells. Canine viruses, such as distemper virus and adenovirus, are being exploited for the treatment of canine cancer as the dog has proven to be a good comparative model for human cancer research and proof of concept investigations. In this review, we introduce the concept of oncolytic viruses and describe some of the preliminary attempts to use oncolytic viruses for the treatment of canine cancer

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Morgan, Professor Iain and Arendt, Ms Maja and Nasir, Professor Lubna
Authors: Arendt, M., Nasir, L., and Morgan, I.M.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Veterinary Medicine
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Infection Immunity and Inflammation
Journal Name:Veterinary and Comparative Oncology
ISSN:1476-5810

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