Diagnostic value of rectal temperature of African cattle of variable coat colour infected with trypanosomes and tick-borne infections

Magona, J.W., Walubengo, J., Olaho-Mukani, W., Jonsson, N.N. and Eisler, M.C. (2009) Diagnostic value of rectal temperature of African cattle of variable coat colour infected with trypanosomes and tick-borne infections. Veterinary Parasitology, 160(3-4), pp. 301-305. (doi:10.1016/j.vetpar.2008.11.020)

Magona, J.W., Walubengo, J., Olaho-Mukani, W., Jonsson, N.N. and Eisler, M.C. (2009) Diagnostic value of rectal temperature of African cattle of variable coat colour infected with trypanosomes and tick-borne infections. Veterinary Parasitology, 160(3-4), pp. 301-305. (doi:10.1016/j.vetpar.2008.11.020)

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Abstract

Diagnosis of major endemic bovine parasitic diseases in sub-Saharan Africa such as trypanosomosis, theileriosis, anaplasmosis, babesiosis; and cowdriosis is increasingly relying on clinical diagnosis due to deterioration of veterinary services and laboratory facilities. Pyrexia is a common clinical feature of aforementioned diseases whose detection relies on measurement of rectal temperature. The research undertaken in this study was aimed at assessing the effects of diurnal changes and variable coat colour of indigenous Nkedi Zebu cattle on the diagnostic value of rectal temperature under tropical conditions. The results revealed that variation in rectal temperature was significantly influenced by time of day it was taken and by the coat colour of the Nkedi Zebu cattle (P < 0.001). Rectal temperature experienced diurnal changes: steadily rising to reach a peak at 17.00 h before declining. The mean rectal temperature of unhealthy cattle was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than that of the healthy ones only between 13.00 and 17.00 h of the day. During which period the proportion of unhealthy cattle having a rectal temperature of 39.4 degrees C or higher was significantly higher than that of healthy ones (P < 0.001). Regarding the variable coat colour of indigenous breeds, rectal temperature among cattle of different coat colours was significantly different (P < 0.05). In conclusion it is important to consider diurnal changes in rectal temperature and differences due to variable coat colour of indigenous African breeds when measuring rectal temperature for assessing pyrexia, during clinical diagnosis of bovine trypanosomosis and tick-borne diseases that are endemic in many countries in sub-Saharan Africa.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Jonsson, Professor Nicholas
Authors: Magona, J.W., Walubengo, J., Olaho-Mukani, W., Jonsson, N.N., and Eisler, M.C.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Veterinary Medicine
Journal Name:Veterinary Parasitology
ISSN:0304-4017

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