The neural basis of intermittent motor control in humans.

Gross, J. (2002) The neural basis of intermittent motor control in humans. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A(99), pp. 2299-302.

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Abstract

The basic question of whether the human brain controls continuous movements intermittently is still under debate. Here we show that 6- to 9-Hz pulsatile velocity changes of slow finger movements are directly correlated to oscillatory activity in the motor cortex, which is sustained by cerebellar drive through thalamus and premotor cortex. Our findings suggest that coupling of 6- to 9-Hz oscillatory activity in the cerebello-thalamo-cortical loop represents the neural mechanism for the intermittent control of continuous movements.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Gross, Professor Joachim
Authors: Gross, J.
College/School:College of Science and Engineering > School of Psychology
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology
Journal Name:Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A

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