Visualization tools for blind people using multiple modalities

Brewster, S.A. (2002) Visualization tools for blind people using multiple modalities. Disability and Rehabilitation, 24(11-12), pp. 613-621. (doi:10.1080/09638280110111388)

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Publisher's URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09638280110111388

Abstract

Purpose: There are many problems when blind people need to access visualizations such as graphs and tables. Current speech or raised-paper technology does not provide a good solution. Our approach is to use non-speech sounds and haptics to allow a richer and more flexible form of access to graphs and tables. Method: Two experiments are reported that test out designs for both sound and haptic graph solutions. In the audio case a standard speech interface is compared to one with non-speech sounds added. The haptic experiment compares two different graph designs to see which was the most effective. Results: Our results for the sound graphs showed a significant decrease in subjective workload, reduced time taken to complete tasks and reduced errors as compared to a standard speech interface. For the haptic graphs reductions in workload and some of the problems that can occur when using such graphs are shown. Conclusions: Using non-speech sound and haptics can significantly improve interaction with visualizations such as graphs. This multimodal approach makes the most of the senses our users have to provide access to information in more flexible ways.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Brewster, Professor Stephen
Authors: Brewster, S.A.
Subjects:Q Science > QA Mathematics > QA75 Electronic computers. Computer science
Q Science > QA Mathematics > QA76 Computer software
College/School:College of Science and Engineering > School of Computing Science
Journal Name:Disability and Rehabilitation
Publisher:Taylor & Francis
ISSN:0963-8288
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2000 Taylor & Francis
First Published:First published in Disability and Rehabilitation 24(11-12):613-1621
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher

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