Enlighten
Research publications by members of the University of Glasgow
home > services > Enlighten

Height and risk of death among men and women: aetiological implications of associations with cardiorespiratory disease and cancer mortality

Davey Smith, G., Hart, C.L., Upton, M., Gillis, C.R., Watt, G., and Hawthorne, V.M. (2000) Height and risk of death among men and women: aetiological implications of associations with cardiorespiratory disease and cancer mortality. Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 54 (2). pp. 97-103. ISSN 0143-005X (doi:10.1136/jech.54.2.97)

[img]
Preview
Text
97.pdf

227Kb

Publisher's URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jech.54.2.97

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Height is inversely associated with cardiovascular disease mortality risk and has shown variable associations with cancer incidence and mortality. The interpretation of findings from previous studies has been constrained by data limitations. Associations between height and specific causes of death were investigated in a large general population cohort of men and women from the West of Scotland. DESIGN: Prospective observational study. SETTING: Renfrew and Paisley, in the West of Scotland. SUBJECTS: 7052 men and 8354 women aged 45-64 were recruited into a study in Renfrew and Paisley, in the West of Scotland, between 1972 and 1976. Detailed assessments of cardiovascular disease risk factors, morbidity and socioeconomic circumstances were made at baseline. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Deaths during 20 years of follow up classified into specific causes. RESULTS: Over the follow up period 3347 men and 2638 women died. Height is inversely associated with all cause, coronary heart disease, stroke, and respiratory disease mortality among men and women. Adjustment for socioeconomic position and cardiovascular risk factors had little influence on these associations. Height is strongly associated with forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and adjustment for FEV1 considerably attenuated the association between height and cardiorespiratory mortality. Smoking related cancer mortality is not associated with height. The risk of deaths from cancer unrelated to smoking tended to increase with height, particularly for haematopoietic, colorectal and prostate cancers. Stomach cancer mortality was inversely associated with height. Adjustment for socioeconomic position had little influence on these associations. CONCLUSION: Height serves partly as an indicator of socioeconomic circumstances and nutritional status in childhood and this may underlie the inverse associations between height and adulthood cardiorespiratory mortality. Much of the association between height and cardiorespiratory mortality was accounted for by lung function, which is also partly determined by exposures acting in childhood. The inverse association between height and stomach cancer mortality probably reflects Helicobacter pylori infection in childhood resulting inor being associated withshorter height. The positive associations between height and several cancers unrelated to smoking could reflect the influence of calorie intake during childhood on the risk of these cancers.

Item Type:Article
Keywords:height; cancer; cardiorespiratory disease
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Davey Smith, Prof George and Watt, Prof Graham
Authors: Davey Smith, G., Hart, C.L., Upton, M., Gillis, C.R., Watt, G., and Hawthorne, V.M.
Subjects:R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine
R Medicine > RC Internal medicine
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > General Practice and Primary Care
Research Group:Midspan
Journal Name:Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health
Publisher:BMJ Publishing Group
ISSN:0143-005X
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2000 BMJ Publishing Group
First Published:First published in Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health 54(2):97-103
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher

University Staff: Request a correction | Enlighten Editors: Update this record

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics