Primary visual cortex activity along the apparent-motion trace reflects illusory perception

Muckli, L. , Kohler, A., Kriegeskorte, N. and Singer, W. (2005) Primary visual cortex activity along the apparent-motion trace reflects illusory perception. PLoS Biology, 3(8), e265. (doi: 10.1371/journal.pbio.0030265)

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Publisher's URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pbio.0030265

Abstract

The illusion of apparent motion can be induced when visual stimuli are successively presented at different locations. It has been shown in previous studies that motion-sensitive regions in extrastriate cortex are relevant for the processing of apparent motion, but it is unclear whether primary visual cortex (V1) is also involved in the representation of the illusory motion path. We investigated, in human subjects, apparent-motion-related activity in patches of V1 representing locations along the path of illusory stimulus motion using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Here we show that apparent motion caused a blood-oxygenation-level-dependent response along the V1 representations of the apparent-motion path, including regions that were not directly activated by the apparent-motion-inducing stimuli. This response was unaltered when participants had to perform an attention-demanding task that diverted their attention away from the stimulus. With a bistable motion quartet, we confirmed that the activity was related to the conscious perception of movement. Our data suggest that V1 is part of the network that represents the illusory path of apparent motion. The activation in V1 can be explained either by lateral interactions within V1 or by feedback mechanisms from higher visual areas, especially the motion-sensitive human MT/V5 complex.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Muckli, Professor Lars
Authors: Muckli, L., Kohler, A., Kriegeskorte, N., and Singer, W.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology
Journal Name:PLoS Biology
Publisher:Public Library of Science
ISSN:1544-9173
ISSN (Online):1545-7885
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2005 The Authors
First Published:First published in PLoS Biology 3(8):e265
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher

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