Enlighten
Research publications by members of the University of Glasgow
home > services > Enlighten

Random telegraph signal amplitudes in sub 100 nm (decanano) MOSFETs: a 3D `Atomistic' simulation study

Asenov, A., Balasubramaniam, R., Brown, A.R., Davies, J.H., and Saini, S. (2000) Random telegraph signal amplitudes in sub 100 nm (decanano) MOSFETs: a 3D `Atomistic' simulation study. In: International Electron Devices Meeting, 10-13 December 2000, San Francisco, California.

[img]
Preview
Text
random2_tele_amp_100.pdf

424Kb

Publisher's URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/IEDM.2000.904311

Abstract

In this paper we use 3D simulations to study the amplitudes of random telegraph signals (RTS) associated with the trapping of a single carrier in interface states in the channel of sub 100 nm (decanano) MOSFETs. Both simulations using continuous doping charge and random discrete dopants in the active region of the MOSFETs are presented. We have studied the dependence of the RTS amplitudes on the position of the trapped charge in the channel and on the device design parameters. We have observed a significant increase in the maximum RTS amplitude when discrete random dopants are employed in the simulations.

Item Type:Conference Proceedings
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Asenov, Prof Asen
Authors: Asenov, A., Balasubramaniam, R., Brown, A.R., Davies, J.H., and Saini, S.
Subjects:T Technology > TK Electrical engineering. Electronics Nuclear engineering
College/School:College of Science and Engineering > School of Engineering > Electronics and Nanoscale Engineering
Research Group:Device Modelling Group
Publisher:Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2000 Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
First Published:First published in International Electron Devices Meeting (2000):279-282
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher

University Staff: Request a correction | Enlighten Editors: Update this record

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics