Effect of suspension systems on the physiological and psychological responses to sub-maximal biking on simulated smooth and bumpy tracks

Titlestad, J., Fairlie-Clarke, T., Whittaker, A.R., Davie, M., Watt, I., and Grant, S. (2006) Effect of suspension systems on the physiological and psychological responses to sub-maximal biking on simulated smooth and bumpy tracks. Journal of Sports Sciences, 24(2), pp. 125-135. (doi:10.1080/02640410500131290)

[img]
Preview
Text
PaperSP03041.pdf

512kB

Publisher's URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02640410500131290

Abstract

The aim of this study was to compare the physiological and psychological responses of cyclists riding on a hard tail bicycle and on a full suspension bicycle. Twenty males participated in two series of tests. A test rig held the front axle of the bicycle steady while the rear wheel rotated against a heavy roller with bumps (or no bumps) on its surface. In the first series of tests, eight participants (age 19 – 27 years, body mass 65 – 82 kg) were tested on both the full suspension and hard tail bicycles with and without bumps fitted to the roller. The second series of test repeated the bump tests with a further six participants (age 22 – 31 years, body mass 74 – 94 kg) and also involved an investigation of familiarization effects with the final six participants (age 21 – 30 years, body mass 64 – 80 kg). Heart rate, oxygen consumption (VO2), rating of perceived exertion (RPE) and comfort were recorded during 10 min sub-maximal tests. Combined data for the bumps tests show that the full suspension bicycle was significantly different (P < 0.001) from the hard tail bicycle on all four measures. Oxygen consumption, heart rate and RPE were lower on average by 8.7 (s = 3.6) ml · kg-1 · min-1, 32.1 (s = 12.1) beats · min-1 and 2.6 (s = 2.0) units, respectively. Comfort scores were higher (better) on average by 1.9 (s = 0.8) units. For the no bumps tests, the only statistically significant difference (P = 0.008) was in VO2, which was lower for the hard tail bicycle by 2.2 (s = 1.7) ml · kg-1 · min-1. The results indicate that the full suspension bicycle provides a physiological and psychological advantage over the hard tail bicycle during simulated sub-maximal exercise on bumps.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Whittaker, Dr Arthur
Authors: Titlestad, J., Fairlie-Clarke, T., Whittaker, A.R., Davie, M., Watt, I., and Grant, S.
Subjects:Q Science > QP Physiology
College/School:College of Science and Engineering > School of Engineering > Systems Power and Energy
Journal Name:Journal of Sports Sciences
Publisher:Taylor and Francis
ISSN:0264-0414
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2006 Taylor and Francis
First Published:First published in Journal of Sports Sciences 24(2):125-135
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher.

University Staff: Request a correction | Enlighten Editors: Update this record