Prevention and early treatment of the long-term physical effects of COVID-19 in adults: design of a randomised controlled trial of resistance exercise—CISCO-21

Morrow, A. et al. (2022) Prevention and early treatment of the long-term physical effects of COVID-19 in adults: design of a randomised controlled trial of resistance exercise—CISCO-21. Trials, 23, 660. (doi: 10.1186/s13063-022-06632-y)

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Abstract

Background: Coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) infection causes persistent health problems such as breathlessness, chest pain and fatigue, and therapies for the prevention and early treatment of post-COVID-19 syndromes are needed. Accordingly, we are investigating the effect of a resistance exercise intervention on exercise capacity and health status following COVID-19 infection. Methods: A two-arm randomised, controlled clinical trial including 220 adults with a diagnosis of COVID-19 in the preceding 6 months. Participants will be classified according to clinical presentation: Group A, not hospitalised due to COVID but persisting symptoms for at least 4 weeks leading to medical review; Group B, discharged after an admission for COVID and with persistent symptoms for at least 4 weeks; or Group C, convalescing in hospital after an admission for COVID. Participants will be randomised to usual care or usual care plus a personalised and pragmatic resistance exercise intervention for 12 weeks. The primary outcome is the incremental shuttle walks test (ISWT) 3 months after randomisation with secondary outcomes including spirometry, grip strength, short performance physical battery (SPPB), frailty status, contacts with healthcare professionals, hospitalisation and questionnaires assessing health-related quality of life, physical activity, fatigue and dyspnoea. Discussion: Ethical approval has been granted by the National Health Service (NHS) West of Scotland Research Ethics Committee (REC) (reference: GN20CA537) and recruitment is ongoing. Trial findings will be disseminated through patient and public forums, scientific conferences and journals.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:The study is funded by a grant from the Chief Scientist Ofce Scotland and the University of Glasgow British Heart Foundation Centre of Research Excellence (RE/18/634217).
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Berry, Professor Colin and Patel, Professor Manish and McConnachie, Professor Alex and Gray, Professor Stuart and Ibbotson, Dr Tracy and Taggart, Miss Diann and Mangion, Dr Kenneth and Cleland, Professor John and Sattar, Professor Naveed and Mair, Professor Frances and Sykes, Dr Robert and Morrow, Dr Andrew and Goodyear, Professor Carl and Bayes, Dr Hannah
Authors: Morrow, A., Gray, S. R., Bayes, H. K., Sykes, R., McGarry, E., Anderson, D., Boiskin, D., Burke, C., Cleland, J. G. F., Goodyear, C., Ibbotson, T., Lang, C. C., McConnachie, A., Mair, F., Mangion, K., Patel, M., Sattar, N., Taggart, D., Taylor, R., Dawkes, S., and Berry, C.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Cardiovascular & Metabolic Health
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Health & Wellbeing > General Practice and Primary Care
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Health & Wellbeing > Robertson Centre
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Infection & Immunity
Journal Name:Trials
Publisher:BioMed Central
ISSN:1745-6215
ISSN (Online):1745-6215
Published Online:15 August 2022
Copyright Holders:Copyright © The Author(s) 2022
First Published:First published in Trials 23: 660
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
303944BHF Centre of ExcellenceColin BerryBritish Heart Foundation (BHF)RE/18/6/34217CAMS - Cardiovascular Science