A multicentre evaluation exploring the impact of an integrated health and social care intervention for the caregivers of ICU survivors

McPeake, J. et al. (2022) A multicentre evaluation exploring the impact of an integrated health and social care intervention for the caregivers of ICU survivors. Critical Care, 26, 152. (doi: 10.1186/s13054-022-04014-z)

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Abstract

Background: Caregivers and family members of Intensive Care Unit (ICU) survivors can face emotional problems following patient discharge from hospital. We aimed to evaluate the impact of a multi-centre integrated health and social care intervention, on caregiver and family member outcomes. Methods: This study evaluated the impact of the Intensive Care Syndrome: Promoting Independence and Return to Employment (InS:PIRE) programme across 9 sites in Scotland. InS:PIRE is an integrated health and social care intervention. We compared caregivers who attended this programme with a contemporary control group of ICU caregivers (usual care cohort), who did not attend. Results: The primary outcome was anxiety measured via the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale at 12 months post-hospital discharge. Secondary outcome measures included depression, carer strain and clinical insomnia. A total of 170 caregivers had data available at 12 months for inclusion in this study; 81 caregivers attended the InS:PIRE intervention and completed outcome measures at 12 months post-hospital discharge. In the usual care cohort of caregivers, 89 completed measures. The two cohorts had similar baseline demographics. After adjustment, those caregivers who attended InS:PIRE demonstrated a significant improvement in symptoms of anxiety (OR: 0.42, 95% CI: 0.20–0.89, p = 0.02), carer strain (OR: 0.39; 95% CI: 0.16–0.98 p = 0.04) and clinical insomnia (OR: 0.40; 95% CI: 0.17–0.77 p < 0.001). There was no significant difference in symptoms of depression at 12 months. Conclusions: This multicentre evaluation has shown that caregivers who attended an integrated health and social care intervention reported improved emotional health and less symptoms of insomnia, 12 months after the delivery of the intervention.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:The project was funded by an award from the Health Foundation (173544) and a THIS. Institute (University of Cambridge) Fellowship 307748-01/PD-2019-02-16.
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Mactavish, Mrs Pamela and Mulhern, Dr Sharon and Henderson, Dr Philip and Quasim, Professor Tara and Shaw, Dr Martin and McPeake, Dr Jo and Daniel, Malcolm
Authors: McPeake, J., Henderson, P., Mactavish, P., Devine, H., Daniel, M., Lucie, P., Bollan, L., Hogg, L., MacMahon, M., Mulhern, S., Murray, P., O’Neill, L., Strachan, L., Iwashyna, T. J., Shaw, M., and Quasim, T.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Cardiovascular & Metabolic Health
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing > Nursing and Health Care
Journal Name:Critical Care
Publisher:BioMed Central
ISSN:1364-8535
ISSN (Online):1466-609X
Copyright Holders:Copyright © The Author(s) 2022
First Published:First published in Critical Care 26:152
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons Licence

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
173544Intensive Care Syndrome: Promoting Independence and Return to EmploymentTara QuasimThe Health Foundation (HEALFOU)Quasim, Dr TaraMed - Anaesthesia