Development of dog vaccination strategies to maintain herd immunity against rabies

Lugelo, A., Hampson, K. , Ferguson, E. A. , Czupryna, A., Bigambo, M., Duamor, C. T., Kazwala, R., Johnson, P. C.D. and Lankester, F. (2022) Development of dog vaccination strategies to maintain herd immunity against rabies. Viruses, 14(4), 830. (doi: 10.3390/v14040830) (PMID:35458560) (PMCID:PMC9028497)

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Abstract

Human rabies can be prevented through mass dog vaccination campaigns; however, in rabies endemic countries, pulsed central point campaigns do not always achieve the recommended coverage of 70%. This study describes the development of a novel approach to sustain high coverage based on decentralized and continuous vaccination delivery. A rabies vaccination campaign was conducted across 12 wards in the Mara region, Tanzania to test this approach. Household surveys were used to obtain data on vaccination coverage as well as factors influencing dog vaccination. A total 17,571 dogs were vaccinated, 2654 using routine central point delivery and 14,917 dogs using one of three strategies of decentralized continuous vaccination. One month after the first vaccination campaign, coverage in areas receiving decentralized vaccinations was higher (64.1, 95% Confidence Intervals (CIs) 62.1−66%) than in areas receiving pulsed vaccinations (35.9%, 95% CIs 32.6−39.5%). Follow-up surveys 10 months later showed that vaccination coverage in areas receiving decentralized vaccinations remained on average over 60% (60.7%, 95% CIs 58.5−62.8%) and much higher than in villages receiving pulsed vaccinations where coverage was on average 32.1% (95% CIs 28.8−35.6%). We conclude that decentralized continuous dog vaccination strategies have the potential to improve vaccination coverage and maintain herd immunity against rabies.

Item Type:Articles
Keywords:Rabies, vaccination strategy, herd immunity, decentralized continuous vaccination, mass dog vaccination.
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Lankester, Dr Felix and Johnson, Dr Paul and Lugelo, Dr Ahmed and Hampson, Professor Katie and Czupryna, Dr Anna and Duamor, Mr Christian and Ferguson, Dr Elaine
Authors: Lugelo, A., Hampson, K., Ferguson, E. A., Czupryna, A., Bigambo, M., Duamor, C. T., Kazwala, R., Johnson, P. C.D., and Lankester, F.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Biodiversity, One Health & Veterinary Medicine
Journal Name:Viruses
Publisher:MDPI
ISSN:1999-4915
ISSN (Online):1999-4915
Published Online:16 April 2022
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2022 The Authors
First Published:First published in Viruses 14(4): 830
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License
Data DOI:10.5281/zenodo.6463278

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
173142African Science Partnership for Intervention Research Excellence (Afrique One-ASPIRE)Daniel HaydonWellcome Trust (WELLCOTR)107753/B/15/ZInstitute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine
301620The Science of Rabies EliminationKatie HampsonWellcome Trust (WELLCOTR)207569/Z/17/ZInstitute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine