Effects of COVID-19-related worry and rumination on mental health and loneliness during the pandemic: longitudinal analyses of adults in the UK COVID-19 mental health & wellbeing study

O'Connor, D. B. et al. (2022) Effects of COVID-19-related worry and rumination on mental health and loneliness during the pandemic: longitudinal analyses of adults in the UK COVID-19 mental health & wellbeing study. Journal of Mental Health, (doi: 10.1080/09638237.2022.2069716) (PMID:35579054) (Early Online Publication)

[img] Text
268517.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives.

2MB

Abstract

Background: The lasting effects of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic are likely to be significant. Aims: This study tracked worry and rumination levels during the pandemic and investigated whether periods with higher COVID-related worry and rumination were associated with more negative mental health and loneliness. Methods: A quota survey design and a sampling frame that permitted recruitment of a national sample were employed. Findings for waves 1 (March 2020) to 6 (November 2020) are reported (N = 1943). Results: Covid-related worry and rumination levels were highest at the beginning of the first lockdown, then declined but increased when the UK returned to lockdown. Worry levels were higher than rumination levels throughout. High levels of COVID-related worry and rumination were associated with a five- and ten-fold increase in clinically meaningful rates of depression and anxiety (respectively) together with lower well-being and higher loneliness. The effects of COVID-related worry on depression and anxiety levels were most marked and clinically meaningful in individuals living with a pre-existing mental health condition. Conclusions: Psychological interventions should include components that specifically target COVID-related worry and rumination. Individuals with pre-existing mental health conditions should be prioritised as we emerge from the current pandemic and in any future public health crises.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:This work was supported by the University of Glasgow, Samaritans, Scottish Association for Mental Health and the Mindstep Foundation.
Status:Early Online Publication
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:O'Carroll, Prof Ronan and Melson, Dr Ambrose and Robb, Professor Katie and Cleare, Dr Seonaid and Zortea, Dr Tiago and Wetherall, Miss Karen and O'Connor, Professor Rory and Mcclelland, Miss Heather and Niedzwiedz, Dr Claire
Authors: O'Connor, D. B., Wilding, S., Ferguson, E., Cleare, S., Wetherall, K., McClelland, H., Melson, A. J., Niedzwiedz, C., O'Carroll, R. E., Platt, S., Scowcroft, E., Watson, B., Zortea, T., Robb, K. A., and O'Connor, R. C.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Health & Wellbeing > General Practice and Primary Care
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Health & Wellbeing > Mental Health and Wellbeing
Journal Name:Journal of Mental Health
Publisher:Taylor and Francis
ISSN:0963-8237
ISSN (Online):1360-0567
Published Online:17 May 2022
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2022 The Authors
First Published:First published in Journal of Mental Health 2022
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

University Staff: Request a correction | Enlighten Editors: Update this record