Exploring student attitudes to directed self-learning online through evaluation of an Internet-based biomolecular sciences resource

Dale, V.H.M., Nasir, L. and Sullivan, M. (2005) Exploring student attitudes to directed self-learning online through evaluation of an Internet-based biomolecular sciences resource. Journal of Veterinary Medical Education, 32(1), pp. 129-137. (doi: 10.3138/jvme.32.1.129)

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Abstract

In 2000, funding was awarded by the University of Glasgow's Learning and Teaching Development Fund (L&TDF) for the authors to develop an interactive, online learning resource for veterinary biomolecular sciences teaching. This course is a core component of the veterinary undergraduate curriculum at the university. Evaluations were carried out to gauge students' experiences of using the resource as a basis for exploring students' attitudes toward online, independent learning. Peers were asked to review the design and content of four modules, also evaluated by students using questionnaires and focus group discussions. Additionally, students were observed using the modules. Both first-year students and second-year direct-entry students (i.e., students entering the veterinary program with advanced training) participated in the evaluation, which allowed for some comparison between the groups. One cohort used the modules independently, and their responses were compared with the cohorts that used the modules in scheduled classes. The evaluations indicate that this is a useful resource that could act as a template for other courses within the veterinary undergraduate curriculum, particularly for learning of basic sciences. On average, first-year and timetabled students rated the program more highly overall, rated the program more highly in relation to previous instruction, and rated tutor presence as more important than second-year direct-entry and independent students did. The lower rating given to tutor presence by second-year direct-entry and independent students indicates that they are more confident using the modules without tutor supervision.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Sullivan, Professor Martin and Nasir, Professor Lubna and Dale, Dr Vicki
Authors: Dale, V.H.M., Nasir, L., and Sullivan, M.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Veterinary Medicine
University Services > Learning and Teaching Services Division
Journal Name:Journal of Veterinary Medical Education
Publisher:University of Toronto Press
ISSN:0748-321X
ISSN (Online):1943-7218

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