Using choice modelling to identify popular and affordable alternative interventions for schistosomiasis in Uganda

Meginnis, K. , Hanley, N. , Mujumbusi, L., Pickering, L. and Lamberton, P. H. L. (2022) Using choice modelling to identify popular and affordable alternative interventions for schistosomiasis in Uganda. Environment and Development Economics, (doi: 10.1017/S1355770X22000079) (Early Online Publication)

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Abstract

Schistosomiasis is caused by a vector-borne parasite, commonly found in low- and middle-income countries. People become infected by direct contact with contaminated water through activities such as collecting water, bathing and fishing. Water becomes contaminated when human waste is not adequately contained. We administered a discrete choice experiment to understand community preferences for interventions that would reduce individuals' risk of contracting, or transmitting, Schistosoma mansoni. These focused on water access, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) interventions. We compared interventions that target behaviours that mainly put oneself at higher risk versus behaviours that mainly put others at risk. We used two payment vehicles to quantify what individuals are willing to give up in time and/or labour for interventions to be implemented. Key findings indicate that new sources of potable water and fines on open defecation are the highest valued interventions.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:This work is supported by the Medical Research Council Global Challenges Research Fund [Grant number MR/P025447/1] in collaboration between the University of Glasgow, Medical Research Council – Ugandan Virus Research Institute (incorporated into the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine) and the Vector Control Division, Ugandan Ministry of Health. PHLL is also funded by her European Research Council Starting Grant (Schisto_Persist 680088) and Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council grants (EP/R01437X/1 and EP/T003618/1).
Status:Early Online Publication
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Pickering, Dr Lucy and Mujumbusi, Dr Lazaro and Meginnis, Dr Keila and Hanley, Professor Nicholas and Lamberton, Dr Poppy
Authors: Meginnis, K., Hanley, N., Mujumbusi, L., Pickering, L., and Lamberton, P. H. L.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Biodiversity Animal Health and Comparative Medicine
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Health Economics and Health Technology Assessment
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing
College of Social Sciences > School of Social and Political Sciences
Journal Name:Environment and Development Economics
Publisher:Cambridge University Press
ISSN:1355-770X
ISSN (Online):1469-4395
Published Online:10 May 2022
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2022 The Authors
First Published:First published in Environment and Development Economics 2022
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
174071Cultural, social and economic influences on ongoing schistosomiasis transmission, despite a decade of mass treatment, and the potential for changePoppy LambertonMedical Research Council (MRC)MR/P025447/1Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine
172876SCHISTO-PERSISTPoppy LambertonEuropean Research Council (ERC)680088Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine
300573Novel low cost diagnostic tools and their impact in AfricaJonathan CooperEngineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC)EP/R01437X/1ENG - Biomedical Engineering
306568Mathematical tools to inform sustainable interventions against schistosomiasis infections in UgandaPoppy LambertonEngineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC)88608 (EP/T003618/1)HW - Health Economics and Health Technology Assessment