Trust, distrust, and testimonial injustice

Carter, J. A. and Meehan, D. (2022) Trust, distrust, and testimonial injustice. Educational Philosophy and Theory, (doi: 10.1080/00131857.2022.2037418) (Early Online Publication)

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Abstract

This essay investigates an underappreciated way in which trust and testimonial injustice are closely connected. Credibility deficit and credibility excess cases both (in their own distinctive ways) contribute to a speaker’s being harmed in her capacity a knower. But moreover, as we will show—by using the tools of a performance-theoretic framework—both credibility deficit and credibility excess cases also feature incompetent trusting on the part of the hearer. That is, credibility deficit and excess cases are shown to manifest qualities of thinkers that are inconducive to trust’s being reliably fulfilled. What this implies is an interesting result about testimonial injustice: to the extent that we want to mitigate against testimonial injustice—one promising way to do so will be to target incompetent trusting of the sort that underlies it. We conclude by outlining and defending what we take to be a promising substantive version of such a mitigation strategy, one which is centred around the cultivation of higher-order trusting competences.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Early Online Publication
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Carter, Dr J Adam and Meehan, Daniella
Authors: Carter, J. A., and Meehan, D.
College/School:College of Arts > School of Humanities > Philosophy
Journal Name:Educational Philosophy and Theory
Publisher:Taylor & Francis
ISSN:0013-1857
ISSN (Online):1469-5812
Published Online:08 April 2022
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2022 The Authors
First Published:First published in Educational Philosophy and Theory 2022
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
306621A Virtue Epistemology of TrustJoseph CarterLeverhulme Trust (LEVERHUL)RPG-2019-302Arts - Philosophy