The impact of vaccination on incidence and outcomes of SARS-CoV-2 infection in patients with kidney failure in Scotland

Bell, S. et al. (2022) The impact of vaccination on incidence and outcomes of SARS-CoV-2 infection in patients with kidney failure in Scotland. Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, 33(4), pp. 677-686. (doi: 10.1681/ASN.2022010046) (PMID:35110363)

[img] Text
263429.pdf - Accepted Version

570kB
[img] Text
263429Suppl.pdf - Supplemental Material

384kB

Abstract

Background: Patients with kidney failure requiring kidney replacement therapy (KRT) are at high risk of complications and death following SARS-CoV-2 infection with variable antibody responses to vaccination reported. We investigated the effects of COVID-19 vaccination on incidence of infection, hospitalization and death of COVID-19 infection. Methods: Study design was an observational data linkage cohort study. Multiple healthcare datasets were linked to ascertain all SARS-CoV-2 testing, vaccination, hospitalization, and mortality data for all patients treated with KRT in Scotland, from the start of the pandemic over a period of 20 months. Descriptive statistics, survival analyses, and vaccine effectiveness were calculated. Results: As of 19th September 2021, 93% (n=5281) of the established KRT population in Scotland had received two doses of an approved SARS-CoV-2 vaccine. Over the study period, there were 814 cases of SARS-CoV-2 infection (15.1% of the KRT population). Vaccine effectiveness against infection and hospitalization was 33% (95% CI 0-52) and 38% (95% CI 0-57) respectively. 9.2% of fully vaccinated individuals died within 28 days of a SARS-CoV-2 positive PCR test (7% dialysis patients and 10% kidney transplant recipients). This compares to <0.1% of the vaccinated Scottish population being admitted to hospital or dying death due to COVID19 during that period. Conclusions: These data demonstrate a primary vaccine course of two doses has limited impact on COVID-19 infection and its complications in patients treated with KRT. Adjunctive strategies to reduce risk of both COVID-19 infection and its complications in this population are urgently required.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Methven, Dr Shona and Thomson, Dr Peter and Joss, Dr Nicola and Mark, Professor Patrick and Findlay, Dr Mark and Spalding, Dr Elaine and Traynor, Dr Jamie
Authors: Bell, S., Campbell, J., Lambourg, E., Watters, C., O’Neil, M., Almond, A., Buck, K., Carr, E. J., Clark, L., Cousland, Z., Findlay, M., Joss, N., Metcalfe, W., Petrie, M., Spalding, E., Traynor, J. P., Sanu, V., Thomson, P., Methven, S., and Mark, P. B.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Cardiovascular & Metabolic Health
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing
Journal Name:Journal of the American Society of Nephrology
Publisher:American Society of Nephrology
ISSN:1046-6673
ISSN (Online):1533-3450
Published Online:02 February 2022
Copyright Holders:Copyright © ASN 2022
First Published:First published in Journal of the American Society of Nephrology 33(4): 677-686
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the publisher copyright policy

University Staff: Request a correction | Enlighten Editors: Update this record