Roles of participation in social activities in the association between adverse childhood experiences and health among older Japanese adults

Nishio, M., Green, M. and Kondo, N. (2022) Roles of participation in social activities in the association between adverse childhood experiences and health among older Japanese adults. SSM - Population Health, 17, 101000. (doi: 10.1016/j.ssmph.2021.101000) (PMID:34988281) (PMCID:PMC8703060)

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Abstract

Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) have shown strong associations with later-life health such as depression and subjective health. Social participation is also associated with later-life health but it is unclear to what extent this could contribute to alleviating harmful impacts of ACEs, nor is it clear whether ACEs are themselves associated with later-life social participation. Thus, this study aims to understand: (1) the influence of ACEs on social participation in later life and (2) whether social participation can alleviate the harmful influences of ACEs on depression and subjective health among Japanese older adults. Data were from 5,671 Japanese older adults (aged 65+) in surveys in 2013 and 2016 as part of the Japan Gerontological Evaluation Study (JAGES). Logistic regression analyses were conducted to estimate the relations between ACEs and later-life social participation, adjusting for potential confounders and mediators. Inverse probability weighting was used to estimate average effects of ACEs on later-depression and subjective health, adjusting for potential confounders, and these were compared against controlled direct effect (CDE) estimates from marginal structural models based on all respondents experiencing weekly social participation. We found that ACEs were associated with reduced later-life social participation (OR for >1 ACEs = 0.88, 95% CI = 0.79, 0.99). The estimated effect of ACEs on depression ( adjusted total effect estimates: OR = 1.23, 95% CI = 1.05, 1.45) was marginally alleviated in estimates assuming weekly social participation for everyone (CDE = 1.18, 95% CI = 0.98, 1.43). A similar tendency was seen for poor subjective heath. Negative impacts of ACEs on depression may be marginally mitigated through social participation, but mitigating effects were moderate. Further investigation on other potential later-life mitigating factors is needed.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Green, Dr Michael and Nishio, Ms Marisa
Creator Roles:
Nishio, M.Conceptualization, Formal analysis, Writing – original draft, Visualization
Green, M.Supervision, Writing – review and editing
Authors: Nishio, M., Green, M., and Kondo, N.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Health & Wellbeing > MRC/CSO SPHSU
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Health & Wellbeing > Social Scientists working in Health and Wellbeing
Journal Name:SSM - Population Health
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:2352-8273
ISSN (Online):2352-8273
Published Online:14 December 2021
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2021 The Authors
First Published:First published in SSM – Population Health 17: 101000
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
3048231Inequalities in healthAlastair LeylandMedical Research Council (MRC)MC_UU_00022/2HW - MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit
3048231Inequalities in healthAlastair LeylandChief Scientist Office (CSO)SPHSU17HW - MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit