Long-term maintenance of multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli carried by vampire bats and shared with livestock in Peru

Benavides, J. A., Godreuil, S., Opazo-Capurro, A., Mahamat, O. O., Falcon, N., Oravcova, K. , Streicker, D. G. and Shiva, C. (2022) Long-term maintenance of multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli carried by vampire bats and shared with livestock in Peru. Science of the Total Environment, 810, 152045. (doi: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2021.152045) (PMID:34883172)

[img] Text
260364.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

1MB

Abstract

Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli (ESBL-E. coli) have been reported in wildlife worldwide. Whether wildlife is transient hosts of ESBL-E. coli or comprises an independently maintained reservoir is unknown. We investigated this question by longitudinally monitoring ESBL-E. coli in common vampire bats and nearby livestock in Peru. Among 388 bats from five vampire bat colonies collected over three years, ESBL-E. coli were detected at a low prevalence (10% in 2015, 4% in 2017 and 2018) compared to a high prevalence (48%) from 134 livestock sampled in 2017. All ESBL-E. coli were multidrug-resistant, and whole genome sequencing of 33 randomly selected ESBL-E. coli isolates (18 recovered from bats) detected 46 genes conferring resistance to antibiotics including third-generation cephalosporins (e.g., blaCTX-M-55, blaCTX-M-15, blaCTX-M-65, blaCTX-M-3 blaCTX-M-14), aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, and colistin (mcr-1). The mcr-1 gene is reported for the first time on a wild bat in Latin America. ESBL-E. coli also carried 31 plasmid replicon types and 16 virulence genes. Twenty-three E. coli sequence types (STs) were detected, including STs involved in clinical infections worldwide (e.g., ST 167, ST 117, ST 10, ST 156 and ST 648). ESBL-E. coli with identical cgMLST (ST 167) were detected in the same bat roost in 2015 and 2017, and several ESBL-E. coli from different bat roosts clustered together in the cgMLST reconstruction, suggesting longterm maintenance of ESBL-E. coli within bats. Most antibiotic resistance and virulence genes were detected in E. coli from both host populations, while ESBL-E. coli ST 744 was found in a bat and a pig from the same locality, suggesting possible cross-species exchanges of genetic material and/or bacteria between bats and livestock. This study suggests that wild mammals can maintain multidrug-resistant bacteria and share them with livestock.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:DS and JAB were funded by a Sir Henry Dale Fellowship, jointly funded by the Wellcome Trust and Royal Society (Grant 102507/Z/13/Z). DS was funded by a Wellcome Trust Senior Research Fellowship (217221/Z/19/Z). CS, JAB, NF and DS were also funded by a CONCYTEC‐UK Embassy grant (No. 003‐2016‐FONDECYT). AO-C was funded by the National Fund for the Scientific and Technological of Chile (FONDECYT-Iniciación, grant number 11190602) and by the ANID Millennium Science Initiative/ Millennium Initiative for Collaborative Research on Bacterial Resistance, MICROB-R, NCN17_081. JAB was funded by the National Fund for the Scientific and Technological of Chile (FONDECYT-Iniciación, grant number 11181017).
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Streicker, Dr Daniel and Benavides, Dr Julio and Oravcova, Dr Katarina
Creator Roles:
Benavides, J. A.Conceptualization, Methodology, Validation, Formal analysis, Investigation, Resources, Data curation, Writing – original draft, Writing – review and editing, Visualization, Project administration, Funding acquisition
Oravcova, K.Methodology, Writing – review and editing
Streicker, D. G.Conceptualization, Resources, Funding acquisition, Writing – review and editing
Authors: Benavides, J. A., Godreuil, S., Opazo-Capurro, A., Mahamat, O. O., Falcon, N., Oravcova, K., Streicker, D. G., and Shiva, C.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Biodiversity Animal Health and Comparative Medicine
Journal Name:Science of the Total Environment
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0048-9697
ISSN (Online):1879-1026
Published Online:07 December 2021
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2021 The Authors
First Published:First published in Science of the Total Environment 810: 152045
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

University Staff: Request a correction | Enlighten Editors: Update this record

Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
169793Managing viral emergence at the interface of bats and livestockDaniel StreickerWellcome Trust (WELLCOTR)102507/Z/13/ZRInstitute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine
307106Epidemiology meets biotechnology: preventing viral emergence from batsDaniel StreickerWellcome Trust (WELLCOTR)217221/Z/19/ZInstitute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine