ABO blood groups do not predict Schistosoma mansoni infection profiles in highly endemic villages of Uganda

Francoeur, R., Atuhaire, A., Arinaitwe, M., Adriko, M., Ajambo, D., Nankasi, A., Babayan, S. A. and Lamberton, P. H.L. (2021) ABO blood groups do not predict Schistosoma mansoni infection profiles in highly endemic villages of Uganda. Microorganisms, 9(12), 2448. (doi: 10.3390/microorganisms9122448) (PMID:34946048) (PMCID:PMC8705964)

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Abstract

Schistosoma mansoni is a parasite which causes significant public-health issues, with over 240 million people infected globally. In Uganda alone, approximately 11.6 million people are affected. Despite over a decade of mass drug administration in this country, hyper-endemic hotspots persist, and individuals who are repeatedly heavily and rapidly reinfected are observed. Human blood-type antigens are known to play a role in the risk of infection for a variety of diseases, due to cross-reactivity between host antibodies and pathogenic antigens. There have been conflicting results on the effect of blood type on schistosomiasis infection and pathology. Moreover, the effect of blood type as a potential intrinsic host factor on S. mansoni prevalence, intensity, clearance, and reinfection dynamics and on co-infection risk remains unknown. Therefore, the epidemiological link between host blood type and S. mansoni infection dynamics was assessed in three hyper-endemic communities in Uganda. Longitudinal data incorporating repeated pretreatment S. mansoni infection intensities and clearance rates were used to analyse associations between blood groups in school-aged children. Soil-transmitted helminth coinfection status and biometric parameters were incorporated in a generalised linear mixed regression model including age, gender, and body mass index (BMI), which have previously been established as significant factors influencing the prevalence and intensity of schistosomiasis. The analysis revealed no associations between blood type and S. mansoni prevalence, infection intensity, clearance, reinfection, or coinfection. Variations in infection profiles were significantly different between the villages, and egg burden significantly decreased with age. While blood type has proven to be a predictor of several diseases, the data collected in this study indicate that it does not play a significant role in S. mansoni infection burdens in these high-endemicity communities.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Francoeur, Ms Rachel and Babayan, Dr Simon and Lamberton, Dr Poppy
Authors: Francoeur, R., Atuhaire, A., Arinaitwe, M., Adriko, M., Ajambo, D., Nankasi, A., Babayan, S. A., and Lamberton, P. H.L.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Biodiversity Animal Health and Comparative Medicine
Journal Name:Microorganisms
Publisher:MDPI
ISSN:2076-2607
ISSN (Online):2076-2607
Published Online:27 November 2021
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2021 The Authors
First Published:First published in Microorganisms 9(12): 2448
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License
Data DOI:10.5525/gla.researchdata.1219

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
172876SCHISTO-PERSISTPoppy LambertonEuropean Research Council (ERC)680088Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine
173707Institutional Strategic Support Fund (2016)Anna DominiczakWellcome Trust (WELLCOTR)204820/Z/16/ZInstitute of Cardiovascular & Medical Sciences
306568Mathematical tools to inform sustainable interventions against schistosomiasis infections in UgandaPoppy LambertonEngineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC)88608 (EP/T003618/1)HW - Health Economics and Health Technology Assessment
300573Novel low cost diagnostic tools and their impact in AfricaJonathan CooperEngineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC)EP/R01437X/1ENG - Biomedical Engineering
174071Cultural, social and economic influences on ongoing schistosomiasis transmission, despite a decade of mass treatment, and the potential for changePoppy LambertonMedical Research Council (MRC)MR/P025447/1Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine