Handgrip strength and all-cause dementia incidence and mortality: findings from the UK Biobank prospective cohort study

Esteban-Cornejo, I. et al. (2022) Handgrip strength and all-cause dementia incidence and mortality: findings from the UK Biobank prospective cohort study. Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle, 13(3), pp. 1514-1525. (doi: 10.1002/jcsm.12857) (PMID:35445560) (PMCID:PMC9178163)

[img] Text
258799.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

1MB

Abstract

Background: This study aimed to investigate the associations of grip strength with incidence and mortality from dementia and whether these associations differ by sociodemographic and lifestyle factors. Methods: A total of 466 788 participants of the UK Biobank (median age 56.5 years, 54.5% women). The outcome was all-cause dementia incidence and mortality and the exposure was grip strength. Grip strength was assessed using a Jamar J00105 hydraulic hand dynamometer. Results: Excluding the first 2 years of follow-up (landmark analysis), mean follow-up was 9.1 years (inter-quartile range: 8.3; 9.7) for incidence and 9.3 (inter-quartile range: 8.7; 10.0) for mortality. During this time, 4087 participants developed dementia, and 1309 died from it. Lower grip strength was associated with a higher risk of dementia incidence and mortality independent of major confounding factors (P < 0.001). Individuals in the lowest quintile of grip strength had 72% [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.55; 1.92] higher incident dementia risk and 87% [95% CI: 1.55; 2.26] higher risk of dementia mortality compared with those in the highest quintile. Our PAF analyses indicate that 30.1% of dementia cases and 32.3% of dementia deaths are attributable to having low grip strength. The association between grip strength and dementia outcomes did not differ by lifestyle or sociodemographic factors. Conclusions: Lower grip strength was associated with a higher risk of all-cause dementia incidence and mortality, independently of important confounding factors.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Celis, Dr Carlos and Gray, Professor Stuart and Gill, Professor Jason and Ho, Dr Frederick and Pell, Professor Jill and Quinn, Dr Terry and Petermann-Rocha, Mrs Fanny and Sattar, Professor Naveed and Lyall, Dr Donald
Authors: Esteban-Cornejo, I., Ho, F., Petermann-Rocha, F., Lyall, D. M., Martinez-Gomez, D., Cabanas-Sanchez, V., Ortega, F. B., Hillman, C. H., Gill, J. M.R., Quinn, T. J., Sattar, N., Pell, J. P., Gray, S. R., and Celis-Morales, C.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Cardiovascular & Metabolic Health
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Health & Wellbeing > Public Health
Journal Name:Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle
Publisher:Wiley
ISSN:2190-5991
ISSN (Online):2190-6009
Published Online:21 April 2022
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2021 The Authors
First Published:First published in Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle 13(3): 1514-1525
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons licence

University Staff: Request a correction | Enlighten Editors: Update this record