Blood meal analysis of tsetse flies (Glossina pallidipes: Glossinidae) reveals higher host fidelity on wild compared with domestic hosts

Channumsin, M., Ciosi, M. , Masiga, D., Auty, H. , Turner, C. M., Kilbride, E. and Mable, B. K. (2021) Blood meal analysis of tsetse flies (Glossina pallidipes: Glossinidae) reveals higher host fidelity on wild compared with domestic hosts. Wellcome Open Research, 6, 213. (doi: 10.12688/wellcomeopenres.16978.1) (PMCID:PMC8513123)

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Publisher's URL: https://doi.org/10.12688/wellcomeopenres.16978.1

Abstract

Background: Changes in climate and land use can alter risk of transmission of parasites between domestic hosts and wildlife, particularly when mediated by vectors that can travel between populations. Here we focused on tsetse flies (genus Glossina), the cyclical vectors for both Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT) and Animal African Trypanosomiasis (AAT). The aims of this study were to investigate three issues related to G. palldipes from Kenya: 1) the diversity of vertebrate hosts that flies fed on; 2) whether host feeding patterns varied in relation to type of hosts, tsetse feeding behaviour, site or tsetse age and sex; and 3) if there was a relationship between trypanosome detection and host feeding behaviours or host types. Methods: Sources of blood meals of Glossina pallidipes were identified by sequencing of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene and analyzed in relationship with previously determined trypanosome detection in the same flies. Results: In an area dominated by wildlife but with seasonal presence of livestock (Nguruman), 98% of tsetse fed on single wild host species, whereas in an area including a mixture of resident domesticated animals, humans and wildlife (Shimba Hills), 52% of flies fed on more than one host species. Multiple Correspondence Analysis revealed strong correlations between feeding pattern, host type and site but these were resolved along a different dimension than trypanosome status, sex and age of the flies. Conclusions: Our results suggest that individual G. pallidipes in interface areas may show higher feeding success on wild hosts when available but often feed on both wild and domesticated hosts. This illustrates the importance of G. pallidipes as a vector connecting the sylvatic and domestic cycles of African trypanosomes.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:Version 1; peer review: 2 approved.
Keywords:Tsetse flies, Trypanosomes, host, host population structure, African trypanosomiasis, blood meal, parasites.
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Auty, Harriet and Masiga, Dr Daniel and Mable, Professor Barbara and Ciosi, Dr Marc and Turner, Professor Michael and Kilbride, Mrs Elizabeth
Creator Roles:
Ciosi, M.Conceptualization, Data curation, Investigation, Methodology, Resources, Validation, Writing – review and editing
Masiga, D.Data curation, Funding acquisition, Investigation, Methodology, Writing – review and editing
Auty, H.Data curation, Investigation, Methodology, Supervision, Validation, Writing – review and editing
Turner, C. M.Conceptualization, Data curation, Funding acquisition, Investigation, Methodology, Project administration, Resources, Supervision, Writing – review and editing
Mable, B. K.Conceptualization, Data curation, Formal analysis, Funding acquisition, Investigation, Methodology, Project administration, Resources, Software, Supervision, Validation, Visualization, Writing – original draft, Writing – review and editing
Authors: Channumsin, M., Ciosi, M., Masiga, D., Auty, H., Turner, C. M., Kilbride, E., and Mable, B. K.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Biodiversity Animal Health and Comparative Medicine
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Infection Immunity and Inflammation
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Molecular Cell and Systems Biology
Journal Name:Wellcome Open Research
Publisher:F1000Research
ISSN:2398-502X
ISSN (Online):2398-502X
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2021 Channumsin M et al.
First Published:First published in Wellcome Open Research 6: 213
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License
Related URLs:
Data DOI:10.6084/m9.figshare.14761815

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
164628The population genetics and co-adaptation of trypanosomes with tsetse fliesBarbara MableWellcome Trust (WELLCOTR)093692/Z/10/ZInstitute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine