Long-term outcomes following severe COVID-19 infection: a propensity matched cohort study

McPeake, J. et al. (2021) Long-term outcomes following severe COVID-19 infection: a propensity matched cohort study. BMJ Open Respiratory Research, 8, e001080. (doi: 10.1136/bmjresp-2021-001080)

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Abstract

Background: There are limited data describing the long-term outcomes of severe COVID-19. We aimed to evaluate the long-term psychosocial and physical consequences of severe COVID-19 for patients. Methods: We conducted a multicentre observational cohort study; between 3 and 7 months posthospital discharge, patients who had been admitted to critical care due to severe COVID-19 were invited to an established recovery service. Standardised questionnaires concerning emotional, physical and social recovery, including information on employment, were completed by patients. Using propensity score matching, we explored outcomes between patients admitted to critical care with and without COVID-19, using data from the same recovery programme. Results: Between July 2020 and December 2020, 93 patients who had been admitted to critical with COVID-19 participated. Emotional dysfunction was common: 46.2% of patients had symptoms of anxiety and 34.4% symptoms of depression. At follow-up 53.7% of previously employed patients had returned to employment; there was a significant difference in return to employment across the socio-economic gradient, with lower numbers of patients from the most deprived areas returning to employment (p=0.03). 91 (97.8%) COVID-19 patients were matched with 91 non-COVID-19 patients. There were no significant differences in any measured outcomes between the two cohorts. Interpretation: Emotional and social problems are common in survivors of severe COVID-19 infection. Coordinated rehabilitation is required to ensure patients make an optimal recovery.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:McInnes, Professor Iain and Henderson, Dr Philip and Grose, Dr Pauline and Mactavish, Mrs Pamela and Quasim, Professor Tara and Sim, Malcolm and Siebert, Professor Stefan and Sharma, Dr Varun and Puxty, Dr Kathryn and Shaw, Dr Martin and McPeake, Dr Jo and Fleming, Mrs Gillian and O'Brien, Dr Peter and Blyth, Professor Kevin
Authors: McPeake, J., Shaw, M., Mactavish, P., Blyth, K., Devine, H., Fleming, G., Gemmell, L., Griffin, J., Grose, P., Henderson, M., Henderson, P., Hogg, L., King, K., McInnes, I., O'Brien, P., Puxty, K., Rainey, C., Sharma, V., Sim, M., Strachan, L., Siebert, S., and Quasim, T.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Cancer Sciences
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing > Nursing and Health Care
Journal Name:BMJ Open Respiratory Research
Publisher:BMJ Publishing Group
ISSN:2052-4439
ISSN (Online):2052-4439
Published Online:09 December 2021
Copyright Holders:Copyright © Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2021
First Published:First published in BMJ Open Respiratory Research 8: e001080
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons licence

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
307748Improving health and social care integration delivery in the acute care environmentJoanne McPeakeUniversity of Cambridge (HEI-CAMB)RG88620HW - MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit