Mapping the genome of American political subcultures: A proposed methodology and pilot study

Miller, D.Y., Barker, D.C. and Carman, C.J. (2006) Mapping the genome of American political subcultures: A proposed methodology and pilot study. Publius: The Journal of Federalism, 36(2), pp. 303-315. (doi:10.1093/publius/pjj015)

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Publisher's URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/publius/pjj015

Abstract

The landmark work of Daniel Elazar spawned a generation of research suggesting that regional subcultures produce consequences for political behavior, governance, and representation across the United States. However, little attention has been paid to directly measuring the degree to which citizens living in particular communities actually share particular value orientations that differ markedly from those of citizens living in other communities and whether such differences are consistent with Elazar's theory. This article proposes a research program devoted to these questions, offers a methodology designed to address them, and describes a pilot study to that effect. Although Elazar's framework stands up to empirical scrutiny in some important respects, a thorough reexamination is in order.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Carman, Professor Christopher
Authors: Miller, D.Y., Barker, D.C., and Carman, C.J.
College/School:College of Social Sciences > School of Social and Political Sciences > Politics
Journal Name:Publius: The Journal of Federalism
ISSN:0048-5950

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