Comparison between dexmedetomidine and acepromazine in combination with methadone for premedication in brachycephalic dogs undergoing surgery for brachycephalic obstructive airway syndrome

Petruccione, I., Murison, P. J. , Flaherty, D. and Auckburally, A. (2021) Comparison between dexmedetomidine and acepromazine in combination with methadone for premedication in brachycephalic dogs undergoing surgery for brachycephalic obstructive airway syndrome. Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia, 48(3), pp. 305-313. (doi: 10.1016/j.vaa.2020.09.008) (PMID:33637411)

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Abstract

Objective: To compare dexmedetomidine with acepromazine for premedication combined with methadone in dogs undergoing brachycephalic obstructive airway syndrome (BOAS) surgery. Study design: Randomized, blinded clinical study. Animals: A group of 40 dogs weighing mean (± standard deviation) 10.5 ± 6 kg, aged 2.6 ± 1.9 years. Methods: Dogs received either acepromazine 20 μg kg–1 (group A) or dexmedetomidine 2 μg kg–1 (group D) intramuscularly with methadone 0.3 mg kg–1. Anaesthesia was induced with propofol and maintained with sevoflurane. Sedation (0–18), induction (0–6) and recovery (0–5) qualities were scored. Propofol dose, hypotension incidence, mechanical ventilation requirement, extubation time, additional sedation, oxygen supplementation, regurgitation and emergency intubation following premedication or during recovery were recorded. Data were analysed using t tests, Mann-Whitney U or Chi-square tests. Results: Group A dogs were less sedated [median (range): 1.5 (0–12)] than group D [5 (1–18)] (p = 0.021) and required more propofol [3.5 (1–7) versus 2.4 (1–8) mg kg–1; p = 0.018]. Induction scores [group A: 5 (4–5); group D 5 (3–5)] (p = 0.989), recovery scores [group A 5 (4–5); group D 5(3–5)](p = 0.738) and anaesthesia duration [group A:93 (50–170); group D 96 (54–263) minutes] (p = 0.758) were similar between groups. Time to extubation was longer in group A 12.5 (3-35) versus group D 5.5 (0–15) minutes; (p = 0.005). During recovery, two dogs required emergency intubation (p > 0.99) and five dogs required additional sedation (p > 0.99). Oxygen supplementation was required in 16 and 12 dogs in group A and D, respectively (p = 0.167); no dogs in group A and one dog in group D regurgitated (p = 0.311). Conclusions and clinical relevance: Dexmedetomidine 2 μg kg–1 produces more sedation but similar recovery quality to acepromazine 20 μg kg–1 combined with methadone in dogs undergoing BOAS surgery.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Murison, Professor Pamela and Petruccione, Ilaria and Auckburally, Mr Adam and Flaherty, Professor Derek
Authors: Petruccione, I., Murison, P. J., Flaherty, D., and Auckburally, A.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Veterinary Medicine
Journal Name:Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1467-2987
ISSN (Online):1467-2995
Published Online:28 January 2021

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