How can we realise the full potential of animal health systems for delivering development and health outcomes?

Auty, H. , Swai, E.S., Virhia, J., Davis, A., de Glanville, W.A., Kibona, T., Lankester, F., Shirima, G. and Cleaveland, S. (2021) How can we realise the full potential of animal health systems for delivering development and health outcomes? Revue scientifique et technique (International Office of Epizootics), 40(2), pp. 483-495. (doi: 10.20506/rst.40.2.3239) (PMID:34542101)

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Publisher's URL: https://www.oie.int/en/what-we-do/publications/scientific-and-technical-review/#ui-id-4

Abstract

Animal health services play an essential role in supporting livestock production, with the potential to address the challenges of hunger, poverty, health, social justice and environmental health as part of the path towards the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) defined in the United Nations, 2030 Agenda. However, the provision of animal health services remains chronically underfunded. Although the aspiration that ‘no one will be left behind’ is core to the SDG agenda, animal health service provision still fails to meet the basic needs of many of the poorest livestock owners. This review draws largely on experience from Tanzania and highlights the obstacles to equitable provision of animal health services, as well as identifying opportunities for improvement. Delivery models that rely on owners paying for services, whether through the private sector or public−private partnerships, can be effective for diseases that are of clear economic importance to animal keepers, particularly in more market-orientated production systems, but are currently constrained by issues of access, affordability, availability and quality. Substantial challenges remain when attempting to control diseases that exert a major burden on animal or human health but are less well recognised, as well as in the delivery of veterinary public health or other public good interventions. Here, the authors propose solutions that focus on: improving awareness of the potential for animal health services to address the SDGs, particularly those concerning public and environmental health; linking this more explicitly with advocacy for increased investment; ensuring that the voices of stakeholders are heard, particularly those of the rural poor; and embracing a cross-cutting and expanded vision for animal health services to support more adaptive development of livestock systems

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:De Glanville, Dr William and Cleaveland, Professor Sarah and Lankester, Dr Felix and Virhia, Miss Jennika and Auty, Harriet
Authors: Auty, H., Swai, E.S., Virhia, J., Davis, A., de Glanville, W.A., Kibona, T., Lankester, F., Shirima, G., and Cleaveland, S.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Biodiversity Animal Health and Comparative Medicine
Journal Name:Revue scientifique et technique (International Office of Epizootics)
Publisher:Office International des Epizooties
ISSN:0253-1933
ISSN (Online):1608-0637
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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
310585An integrated approach to tackling drug resistance in livestock trypanosomes.Harriet AutyBiotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC)BB/S000143/2Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine
190825Social, economic and environmental drivers of zoonoses in Tanzania (SEEDZ)Sarah CleavelandBiotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC)BB/L018926/1Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine
171979Zoonoses and Emerging Livestock Systems ZELS Reducing the risk to livestock and people programme associated studentships - ZELS-ASSarah CleavelandBiotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC)BB/N503563/1Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine
190437Impact, ecology and social determinants of bacterial zoonoses in northern TanzaniaSarah CleavelandBiotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC)BB/J010367/1Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine