Child maltreatment and incident mental disorders in middle and older ages: a retrospective UK Biobank cohort study

Macpherson, J. M. et al. (2021) Child maltreatment and incident mental disorders in middle and older ages: a retrospective UK Biobank cohort study. Lancet Regional Health - Europe, 11, 100224. (doi: 10.1016/j.lanepe.2021.100224) (PMID:34917999) (PMCID:PMC8642708)

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Abstract

Background: Understanding the mental health consequences of child maltreatment at different life stages is important in accurately quantifying the burden of maltreatment. This study investigated the association between child maltreatment and incident mental disorders in middle and older age as well as the potential mediators and moderators. Methods: This is a retrospective cohort study of 56,082 participants from UK Biobank. Child maltreatment was recalled using the Childhood Trauma Screener. Incident mental disorders, including depressive, anxiety and affective disorders, behavioural syndromes, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), schizophrenia, substance abuse, and dementia, after baseline assessment were ascertained through linkage to primary care records. Findings: There was a dose-response relationship between child maltreatment and mental disorder. Those who experienced three or more maltreatment types had the highest risk of all mental disorders (HR 1.85, 95% CI: 1.67-2.06) followed by those who experienced two (HR 1.48, 95% CI: 1.35-1.63) and then one (HR 1.26, 95% CI: 1.19-2.35). Child maltreatment was most strongly associated with PTSD (HR 1.59, 95% CI: 1.20-2.10 P=0.001). The excess risk was largely unexplained by the included mediators. The association between child maltreatment and all mental disorders were stronger among participants who binge drank (Pinteraction=0.003) or had few social visits (Pinteraction=0.003). Interpretation: The mental health consequence of child maltreatment could last decades, even among those who had no recorded mental disorders in early adulthood. In the absence of strong mediators, prevention of child maltreatment remains the priority. Funding: Wellcome Trust Institutional Strategic Support Fund.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Ho, Dr Frederick and Welsh, Dr Paul and Celis, Dr Carlos and Gray, Professor Stuart and Pell, Professor Jill and Hanlon, Dr Peter and MACPHERSON, Mr JOHN and McCallum, Dr Marianne and Minnis, Professor Helen and Mair, Professor Frances
Authors: Macpherson, J. M., Gray, S. R., Ip, P., McCallum, M., Hanlon, P., Welsh, P., Chan, K. L., Mair, F. S., Celis-Morales, C., Minnis, H., Pell, J. P., and Ho, F. K.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Cardiovascular & Metabolic Health
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Health & Wellbeing > General Practice and Primary Care
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Health & Wellbeing > Public Health
Journal Name:Lancet Regional Health - Europe
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:2666-7762
ISSN (Online):2666-7762
Published Online:27 September 2021
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2021 The Authors
First Published:First published in Lancet Regional Health - Europe 11: 100224
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License
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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
173707Institutional Strategic Support Fund (2016)Anna DominiczakWellcome Trust (WELLCOTR)204820/Z/16/ZInstitute of Cardiovascular & Medical Sciences