Childhood neurodevelopmental markers and risk of premature mortality: follow-up to age 60–65 years in the Aberdeen Children of the 1950s study

Warrilow, A., Der, G. , Cooper, S.-A. , Minnis, H. and Pell, J. P. (2021) Childhood neurodevelopmental markers and risk of premature mortality: follow-up to age 60–65 years in the Aberdeen Children of the 1950s study. PLoS ONE, 16(8), e0255649. (doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0255649) (PMID:34407087) (PMCID:PMC8372930)

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Abstract

Background: Individual neurodevelopmental disorders are associated with premature mortality. Little is known about the association between multiple neurodevelopmental markers and premature mortality at a population level. The ESSENCE (Early Symptomatic Syndromes Eliciting Neurodevelopmental Clinical Examinations) approach considers multiple neurodevelopmental parameters, assessing several markers in parallel that cluster, rather than considering individual diagnostic categories in isolation. Objectives: To determine whether childhood neurodevelopmental markers, including reduced intellectual functioning, are associated with all-cause premature mortality. Methods and procedures: In a general population cohort study (n = 12,150) with longitudinal follow up from childhood to middle age, Cox proportional hazard models were used to study the associations between childhood neurodevelopmental markers (Rutter B scale and IQ) and premature all-cause mortality. Outcomes and results: The cognitive measures and 21 of the 26 Rutter B items were significantly associated with premature mortality in bivariate analyses with hazard ratios from 1.24 (95% CI 1.05–1.47) to 2.25 (95% CI 1.78–2.90). In the final adjusted model, neurodevelopmental markers suggestive of several domains including hyperactivity, conduct problems and intellectual impairment were positively associated with premature mortality and improved prediction of premature mortality. Conclusions: A wide range of neurodevelopmental markers, including childhood IQ, were found to predict premature mortality in a large general population cohort with longitudinal follow up to 60–65 years of age. Implications: These findings highlight the importance of a holistic assessment of children with neurodevelopmental markers that addresses a range of neurodevelopmental conditions. Our findings could open the door to a shift in child public mental health focus, where multiple and/or cumulative markers of neurodevelopmental conditions alert clinicians to the need for early intervention. This could lead to a reduction in the risk of broad health outcomes at a population level.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:Funding: PsySTAR fellowship (Medical Research Foundation and the Medical Research Council Grant Ref: MR/J000914/1) to Dr Adele Warrilow.
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Cooper, Professor Sally-Ann and Pell, Professor Jill and Minnis, Professor Helen and Warrilow, Adele and Der, Mr Geoffrey
Creator Roles:
Warrilow, A.Conceptualization, Data curation, Formal analysis, Methodology, Writing – original draft, Writing – review and editing
Der, G.Conceptualization, Formal analysis, Methodology, Supervision, Writing – original draft, Writing – review and editing
Cooper, S.-A.Conceptualization, Methodology, Supervision, Writing – original draft, Writing – review and editing
Minnis, H.Conceptualization, Methodology, Supervision, Writing – original draft, Writing – review and editing
Pell, J. P.Methodology, Supervision, Writing – original draft, Writing – review and editing
Authors: Warrilow, A., Der, G., Cooper, S.-A., Minnis, H., and Pell, J. P.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Mental Health and Wellbeing
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > MRC/CSO SPHSU
Journal Name:PLoS ONE
Publisher:Public Library of Science
ISSN:1932-6203
ISSN (Online):1932-6203
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2021 Warrilow et al.
First Published:First published in PLoS ONE 16(8): e0255649
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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