Absolute and relative grip strength as predictors of cancer: prospective cohort study of 445 552 participants in UK Biobank

Parra Soto, S. L., Pell, J. P. , Celis-Morales, C. and Ho, F. (2022) Absolute and relative grip strength as predictors of cancer: prospective cohort study of 445 552 participants in UK Biobank. Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle, 13(1), pp. 325-332. (doi: 10.1002/jcsm.12863) (PMID:34953058) (PMCID:PMC8818619)

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Abstract

Background: Reduced muscular strength, as measured by absolute grip strength, has been associated with increased risk of some site-specific cancers. The ability of grip strength to predict other diseases may be affected by whether it is expressed in absolute or relative terms, but the evidence for cancer is scarce. This study compared the associations of absolute and relative grip strength with all-cause and 15 site-specific cancers. Methods A prospective cohort study was undertaken using data from the UK Biobank. The exposure variable was grip strength, in absolute form (kilogrammes) and relative to weight, body mass index (BMI), height. and body fat mass. The outcome was incident cancer, at 15 sites and overall. Cox proportional hazard models were performed to study the associations. Results: This study included 445 552 participants, where 53.8% of the participants were women, with a mean (SD) age of 56.3 (8.11) years. During a median of 8.8 years follow-up period, 48 886 (11.0%) patients were diagnosed with cancer. After adjusting for sociodemographic and lifestyle factors, as well as multiple testing, absolute grip strength was inversely and linearly associated with endometrial [hazard ratio (HR): 0.74, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.69; 0.79, P value <0.001], gallbladder (HR: 0.81, 95% CI: 0.72; 0.92, P value = 0.001), liver (HR: 0.86, 95% CI: 0.79; 0.93, P value <0.001), kidney (HR: 0.93, 95% CI: 0.88; 0.99), and breast (HR: 0.93, 95% CI: 0.91; 0.96, P value = 0.031), as well as all-cause cancer (HR: 0.97, 95% CI: 0.95; 0.98, P value <0.001). Eight cancer sites were inversely associated with HGS relative to weight and BMI: endometrium, liver, gallbladder, kidney, oesophagus, pancreas, colorectal, breast, and all-cause cancer. Compared with absolute grip strength, grip strength relative to body fat mass had better discriminatory power for head and neck and breast cancer. Grip strength relative to BMI was marginally better than absolute grip strength in predicting stomach cancer. Conclusions: Grip strength was associated with risk of several site-specific cancers and all-cause cancer. Head and neck and breast cancers might be better predicted by relative grip strength.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:UK Biobank was established and funded by the Wellcome Trust medical charity, Medical Research Council, Department of Health, Scottish Government and the Northwest Regional Development Agency. It has also had funding from the Welsh Assembly Government and the British Heart Foundation. SPS was funded by the Chilean Government PhD scholarship program.
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Ho, Dr Frederick and Celis, Dr Carlos and Pell, Professor Jill and Parra, Solange
Authors: Parra Soto, S. L., Pell, J. P., Celis-Morales, C., and Ho, F.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > General Practice and Primary Care
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Public Health
Journal Name:Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle
Publisher:Wiley
ISSN:2190-5991
ISSN (Online):2190-6009
Published Online:24 December 2021
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2021 The Authors
First Published:First published in Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle 13(1): 325-332
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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