SurgiCal Obesity Treatment Study (SCOTS): a prospective, observational cohort study on health and socioeconomic burden in treatment-seeking individuals with severe obesity in Scotland, UK

Mackenzie, R. M. et al. (2021) SurgiCal Obesity Treatment Study (SCOTS): a prospective, observational cohort study on health and socioeconomic burden in treatment-seeking individuals with severe obesity in Scotland, UK. BMJ Open, 11(8), e046441. (doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2020-046441) (PMID:34446484)

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Abstract

Objectives: There is a lack of evidence to inform the delivery and follow-up of bariatric surgery for people with severe obesity. The SurgiCal Obesity Treatment Study (SCOTS) is a national longitudinal cohort of people undergoing bariatric surgery. Here, we describe characteristics of the recruited SCOTS cohort, and the relationship between health and socioeconomic status with body mass index (BMI) and age. Participants/Methods: 445 participants scheduled for bariatric surgery at any of 14 centres in Scotland, UK, were recruited between 2013 and 2016 for this longitudinal cohort study (1 withdrawal); 249 completed health-related preoperative patient-reported outcome measures. Regression models were used to estimate the effect of a 10-unit increase in age or BMI, adjusting for sex, smoking and socioeconomic status. Results: Mean age was 46 years and median BMI was 47 kg/m2. For each 10 kg/m2 higher BMI, there was a change of −5.2 (95% CI −6.9 to –3.5; p<0.0001) in Rand 12-item Short Form Survey Physical Component Summary (SF-12 PCS), −0.1 (95% CI −0.2 to –0.1; p<0.0001) in EuroQoL 5-level EQ-5D version index score and 14.2 (95% CI 10.7 to 17.7; p<0.0001) in Impact of Weight on Quality of Life-Lite Physical Function Score. We observed a 3.1 times higher use of specialist aids and equipment at home (OR: 3.1, 95% CI 1.9 to 5.0; p<0.0001). Broadly, similar results were seen for each 10-year higher age, including a change of −2.1 (95% CI −3.7 to –0.5; p<0.01) in SF-12 PCS. Conclusions: A higher BMI combined with older age is associated with poor physical functioning and quality of life in people seeking bariatric surgery treatment. Policy-makers must consider the health and care needs of these individuals and invest to provide increased access to effective weight management. Trial registration number: ISRCTN47072588.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Stewart, Miss Sally and Lean, Professor Michael and MacKenzie, Dr Ruth and Greenlaw, Miss Nicola and Grieve, Miss Eleanor and Sattar, Professor Naveed and Ford, Professor Ian and Logue, Dr Jennifer
Authors: Mackenzie, R. M., Greenlaw, N., Ali, A., Bruce, D., Bruce, J., Grieve, E., Lean, M., Lindsay, R., Sattar, N., Stewart, S., Ford, I., and Logue, J.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Health Economics and Health Technology Assessment
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > MRC/CSO SPHSU
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Robertson Centre
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing
Journal Name:BMJ Open
Publisher:BMJ Publishing Group
ISSN:2044-6055
ISSN (Online):2044-6055
Published Online:26 August 2021
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2021 The Authors
First Published:First published in BMJ Open 11(8): e046441
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License
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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
190433SurgiCal Obesity Treatment Study (SCOTS)Robert LindsayNational Institute for Health Research (NIHR)10/42/02&006/845Institute of Cardiovascular & Medical Sciences