Glucose and fructose hydrogel enhances running performance, exogenous carbohydrate oxidation, and gastrointestinal tolerance

Rowe, J. T., King, R. F.G.J., King, A. J., Morrison, D. J. , Preston, T. , Wilson, O. J. and O'Hara, J. P. (2022) Glucose and fructose hydrogel enhances running performance, exogenous carbohydrate oxidation, and gastrointestinal tolerance. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 54(1), pp. 129-140. (doi: 10.1249/MSS.0000000000002764) (PMID:34334720)

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Abstract

Purpose: Beneficial effects of carbohydrate (CHO) ingestion on exogenous CHO oxidation and endurance performance require a well-functioning gastrointestinal (GI) tract. However, GI complaints are common during endurance running. This study investigated the effect of a CHO solution-containing sodium alginate and pectin (hydrogel) on endurance running performance, exogenous and endogenous CHO oxidation and GI symptoms. Methods: Eleven trained male runners, using a randomised, double-blind design, completed three 120-minute steady state runs at 68% V[Combining Dot Above]O2max, followed by a 5-km time-trial. Participants ingested 90 g·h-1 of 2:1 glucose:fructose (13C enriched) either as a CHO hydrogel, a standard CHO solution (non-hydrogel), or a CHO-free placebo during the 120 minutes. Fat oxidation, total and exogenous CHO oxidation, plasma glucose oxidation and endogenous glucose oxidation from liver and muscle glycogen were calculated using indirect calorimetry and isotope ratio mass spectrometry. GI symptoms were recorded throughout the trial.RESULTS: Time-trial performance was 7.6% and 5.6% faster after hydrogel ([minutes:seconds]19:29 ± 2:24; p < 0.001) and non-hydrogel (19:54 ± 2:23, p = 0.002), respectively, versus placebo (21:05 ± 2:34). Time-trial performance after hydrogel was 2.1% faster (p = 0.033) than non-hydrogel. Absolute and relative exogenous CHO oxidation was greater with hydrogel (68.6 ± 10.8 g, 31.9 ± 2.7%; p = 0.01) versus non-hydrogel (63.4 ± 8.1 g, 29.3 ± 2.0%; p = 0.003). Absolute and relative endogenous CHO oxidation were lower in both CHO conditions compared with placebo (p < 0.001), with no difference between CHO conditions. Absolute and relative liver glucose and muscle glycogen oxidation were not different between CHO conditions. Total GI symptoms were not different between hydrogel and placebo, but GI symptoms was higher in non-hydrogel compared with placebo and hydrogel (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Ingestion of glucose and fructose in hydrogel form during running benefited endurance performance, exogenous CHO oxidation and GI symptoms, compared with a standard CHO solution.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Preston, Professor Tom and Morrison, Dr Douglas
Authors: Rowe, J. T., King, R. F.G.J., King, A. J., Morrison, D. J., Preston, T., Wilson, O. J., and O'Hara, J. P.
College/School:College of Science and Engineering > Scottish Universities Environmental Research Centre
Journal Name:Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
Publisher:Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins
ISSN:0195-9131
ISSN (Online):1530-0315
Published Online:30 July 2021
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2021 American College of Sports Medicine
First Published:First published in Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise 54(1): 129-140
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the publisher copyright policy

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