Long Covid in adults discharged from UK hospitals after Covid-19: a prospective, multicentre cohort study using the ISARIC WHO Clinical Characterisation Protocol

Sigfrid, L. et al. (2021) Long Covid in adults discharged from UK hospitals after Covid-19: a prospective, multicentre cohort study using the ISARIC WHO Clinical Characterisation Protocol. Lancet Regional Health - Europe, 8, 100186. (doi: 10.1016/j.lanepe.2021.100186) (PMID:34386785) (PMCID:PMC8343377)

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Abstract

Background: This study sought to establish the long-term effects of Covid-19 following hospitalisation. Methods: 327 hospitalised participants, with SARS-CoV-2 infection were recruited into a prospective multicentre cohort study at least 3 months post-discharge. The primary outcome was self-reported recovery at least ninety days after initial Covid-19 symptom onset. Secondary outcomes included new symptoms, disability (Washington group short scale), breathlessness (MRC Dyspnoea scale) and quality of life (EQ5D-5L). Findings: 55% of participants reported not feeling fully recovered. 93% reported persistent symptoms, with fatigue the most common (83%), followed by breathlessness (54%). 47% reported an increase in MRC dyspnoea scale of at least one grade. New or worse disability was reported by 24% of participants. The EQ5D-5L summary index was significantly worse following acute illness (median difference 0.1 points on a scale of 0 to 1, IQR: -0.2 to 0.0). Females under the age of 50 years were five times less likely to report feeling recovered (adjusted OR 5.09, 95% CI 1.64 to 15.74), were more likely to have greater disability (adjusted OR 4.22, 95% CI 1.12 to 15.94), twice as likely to report worse fatigue (adjusted OR 2.06, 95% CI 0.81 to 3.31) and seven times more likely to become more breathless (adjusted OR 7.15, 95% CI 2.24 to 22.83) than men of the same age. Interpretation: Survivors of Covid-19 experienced long-term symptoms, new disability, increased breathlessness, and reduced quality of life. These findings were present in young, previously healthy working age adults, and were most common in younger females. Funding: National Institute for Health Research, UK Medical Research Council, Wellcome Trust, Department for International Development and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Hastie, Dr Claire and Baillie, Dr Kenneth and Ho, Dr Antonia and Scott, Dr Janet and Lowe, Dr David and McPeake, Dr Jo and Berry, Professor Colin
Authors: Sigfrid, L., Drake, T. M., Pauley, E., Jesudason, E. C., Olliaro, P., Lim, W. S., Gillesen, A., Berry, C., Lowe, D. J., McPeake, J., Lone, N., Munblit, D., Casey, A., Banniester, P., Russell, C. D., Goodwin, L., Ho, A., Turtle, L., O'Hara, M. E., Hastie, C., Donohue, C., Spencer, R. G., Donegan, C., Gummery, A., Harrison, J., Hardwick, H. E., Hastie, C. E., Carson, G., Merson, L., Baillie, J. K., Openshaw, P. J.M., Harrison, E. M., Docherty, A. B., Semple, M. G., and Scott, J. T.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Public Health
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Infection Immunity and Inflammation
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing > Nursing and Health Care
Journal Name:Lancet Regional Health - Europe
Publisher:Lancet Publishing Group
ISSN:2666-7762
ISSN (Online):2666-7762
Published Online:05 August 2021
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2021 The Authors
First Published:First published in Lancet Regional Health - Europe 8: 100186
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License
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