Standard multiple imputation of survey data didn’t perform better than simple substitution in enhancing an administrative dataset: the example of self-rated health in England

Popham, F. , Whitley, E. , Molaodi, O. and Gray, L. (2021) Standard multiple imputation of survey data didn’t perform better than simple substitution in enhancing an administrative dataset: the example of self-rated health in England. Emerging Themes in Epidemiology, 18, 9. (doi: 10.1186/s12982-021-00099-z) (PMID:34303377) (PMCID:PMC8310590)

[img] Text
246953.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

872kB

Abstract

Background: Health surveys provide a rich array of information but on relatively small numbers of individuals and evidence suggests that they are becoming less representative as response levels fall. Routinely collected administrative data offer more extensive population coverage but typically comprise fewer health topics. We explore whether data combination and multiple imputation of health variables from survey data is a simple and robust way of generating these variables in the general population. Methods: We use the UK Integrated Household Survey and the English 2011 population census both of which included self-rated general health. Setting aside the census self-rated health data we multiply imputed self-rated health responses for the census using the survey data and compared these with the actual census results in 576 unique groups defined by age, sex, housing tenure and geographic region. Results: Compared with original census data across the groups, multiply imputed proportions of bad or very bad self-rated health were not a markedly better fit than those simply derived from the survey proportions. Conclusion: While multiple imputation may have the potential to augment population data with information from surveys, further testing and refinement is required.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Popham, Dr Frank and Gray, Dr Linsay and Molaodi, Dr Oarabile and Whitley, Dr Elise
Authors: Popham, F., Whitley, E., Molaodi, O., and Gray, L.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > MRC/CSO SPHSU
Journal Name:Emerging Themes in Epidemiology
Publisher:BioMed Central
ISSN:1742-7622
ISSN (Online):1742-7622
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2021 The Authors
First Published:First published in Emerging Themes in Epidemiology 18: 9
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

University Staff: Request a correction | Enlighten Editors: Update this record

Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
727651SPHSU Core Renewal: Measuring and Analysing Socioeconomic Inequalities in Health Research ProgrammeAlastair LeylandMedical Research Council (MRC)MC_UU_12017/13IHW - MRC/CSO SPHU
Chief Scientist Office (CSO)SPHSU13