Association and pathways between shift work and cardiovascular disease: a prospective cohort study of 238 661 participants from UK Biobank

Ho, F. K., Celis-Morales, C. , Gray, S. R. , Demou, E. , Mackay, D. , Welsh, P. , Katikireddi, S. V. , Sattar, N. and Pell, J. P. (2021) Association and pathways between shift work and cardiovascular disease: a prospective cohort study of 238 661 participants from UK Biobank. International Journal of Epidemiology, (doi: 10.1093/ije/dyab144) (PMID:34414428) (Early Online Publication)

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Publisher's URL: https://academic.oup.com/ije/advance-article/doi/10.1093/ije/dyab144/6355315

Abstract

Background: This study aimed to study the association between shift work and incident and fatal cardiovascular disease (CVD), and to explore modifying and mediating factors. Methods: This is a population-based, prospective cohort study with a median follow-up of 11 years; 238 661 UK Biobank participants who were in paid employment or self-employed at baseline assessment were included. Results: Shift workers had higher risk of incident [hazard ratio (HR) 1.11, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.06–1.19] and fatal (HR 1.25, 95% CI 1.08–1.44) CVD compared with non-shift workers, after adjusting for socio-economic and work-related factors. The risk was higher with longer duration of shift work, in women and in jobs with little heavy manual labour. Current smoking, short sleep duration, poor sleep quality, adiposity, higher glycated haemoglobin and higher cystatin C were identified as the main potentially modifiable mediators. Mediators collectively explained 52.3% of the associations between shift work and incident CVDs. Conclusions: Shift workers have higher risk of incident and fatal CVD, partly mediated through modifiable risk factors such as smoking, sleep duration and quality, adiposity and metabolic status. Workplace interventions targeting these mediators have the potential to alleviate shift workers’ CVD risk.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Early Online Publication
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Katikireddi, Professor Vittal and Celis, Dr Carlos and Gray, Dr Stuart and Demou, Dr Evangelia and Ho, Dr Frederick and Welsh, Dr Paul and Pell, Professor Jill and Mackay, Professor Daniel and Sattar, Professor Naveed
Authors: Ho, F. K., Celis-Morales, C., Gray, S. R., Demou, E., Mackay, D., Welsh, P., Katikireddi, S. V., Sattar, N., and Pell, J. P.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > General Practice and Primary Care
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > MRC/CSO SPHSU
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Public Health
Journal Name:International Journal of Epidemiology
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:0300-5771
ISSN (Online):1464-3685
Published Online:20 August 2021
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2021 The Authors
First Published:First published in International Journal of Epidemiology 2021
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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