How do pregnant women with additional health or social care needs experience parenting groups: Evidence from delivery of Enhanced Triple P for Baby and Mellow Bumps as part of the Trial of Healthy Relationships Initiatives in the Very Early Years (THRIVE)

Buston, K. , MacLachlan, A. and Henderson, M. (2021) How do pregnant women with additional health or social care needs experience parenting groups: Evidence from delivery of Enhanced Triple P for Baby and Mellow Bumps as part of the Trial of Healthy Relationships Initiatives in the Very Early Years (THRIVE). Child Care in Practice, (doi: 10.1080/13575279.2021.1933902) (Early Online Publication)

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Abstract

There is still relatively little known about when, why, how and in what circumstances parenting interventions are effective. Support within the group context has been theorised as a key mechanism. This paper explores how pregnant women with additional health or social care needs participating in two group parenting interventions—Mellow Bumps or Enhanced Triple P for Babies—experienced being in a parenting group, and how this shaped how they engaged with the interventions; and it examines how group delivery may have facilitated or inhibited the effectiveness of the interventions, and for whom it did so. Session evaluation forms (n = 708) and a post-intervention questionnaire (n = 117) were completed by participants. In-depth interviews were conducted following the MB/ETPB antenatal sessions (n = 19), and 6–12 months after the birth of their baby (n = 15). Group delivery of these parenting interventions had the potential to support participants, particularly those with multiple additional health and social care needs. There are, however, important caveats including patchy attendance reducing the supportiveness of the groups, and few discernible longer terms changes. More group sessions, less patchy attendance, and more encouragement from facilitators for the women to keep in touch, and to join other community parent–child groups after the birth of their baby are likely to have increased feelings of support and connectedness.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Early Online Publication
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Henderson, Prof Marion and Maclachlan, Dr Alice and Buston, Dr Katie
Authors: Buston, K., MacLachlan, A., and Henderson, M.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > General Practice and Primary Care
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > MRC/CSO SPHSU
Journal Name:Child Care in Practice
Publisher:Taylor & Francis
ISSN:1357-5279
ISSN (Online):1476-489X
Published Online:17 June 2021
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2021 The Authors
First Published:First published in Child Care in Practice 2021
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
190732Trial of Healthy Relationship Initiatives for the Very Early-years (THRIVE): a Three-Arm Randomised Control Trial for Mothers Identified as Vulnerable in Pregnancy and their Babies who are at High...Marion HendersonNational Institute for Health Research (NIHR)11/3002/01HW - MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit
727631SPHSU Core Renewal: Relationships & Health Improvement Research ProgrammeLisa McDaidMedical Research Council (MRC)MC_UU_12017/11IHW - MRC/CSO SPHU
Chief Scientific AdviserSPHSU11