Older adults’ experiences of a physical activity and sedentary behaviour intervention: a nested qualitative study in the SITLESS multi-country randomised clinical trial

Blackburn, N. et al. (2021) Older adults’ experiences of a physical activity and sedentary behaviour intervention: a nested qualitative study in the SITLESS multi-country randomised clinical trial. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 18(9), e4730. (doi: 10.3390/ijerph18094730) (PMID:33946717) (PMCID:PMC8124427)

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Abstract

Background: The SITLESS programme comprises exercise referral schemes and self-management strategies and has been evaluated in a trial in Denmark, Spain, Germany and Northern Ireland. The aim of this qualitative study was to understand the implementation and contextual aspects of the intervention in relation to the mechanisms of impact and to explore the perceived effects. Methods: Qualitative methodologies were nested in the SITLESS trial including 71 individual interviews and 12 focus groups targeting intervention and control group participants from postintervention to 18-month follow-up in all intervention sites based on a semi-structured topic guide. Results: Overarching themes were identified under the framework categories of context, implementation, mechanisms of impact and perceived effects. The findings highlight the perceived barriers and facilitators to older adults’ engagement in exercise referral schemes. Social interaction and enjoyment through the group-based programmes are key components to promote adherence and encourage the maintenance of targeted behaviours through peer support and connectedness. Exit strategies and signposting to relevant classes and facilities enabled the maintenance of positive lifestyle behaviours. Conclusions: When designing and implementing interventions, key components enhancing social interaction, enjoyment and continuity should be in place in order to successfully promote sustained behaviour change.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:Funding: The SITLESS project had been funded by the European Union program Horizon 2020 (H2020-Grant 634270).
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:McIntosh, Professor Emma and Deidda, Dr Manuela
Creator Roles:
Deidda, M.Writing – review and editing
McIntosh, E.Resources, Writing – review and editing, Project administration, Funding acquisition
Authors: Blackburn, N., Skjodt, M., Tully, M., Mc Mullan, I., Giné-Garriga, M., Caserotti, P., Blancafort, S., Santiago, M., Rodriguez-Garrido, S., Weinmayr, G., John-Köhler, U., Wirth, K., Jerez-Roig, J., Dallmeier, D., Wilson, J., Deidda, M., McIntosh, E., and Coll-Planas, L.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Health Economics and Health Technology Assessment
Journal Name:International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Publisher:MDPI
ISSN:1660-4601
ISSN (Online):1660-4601
Published Online:29 April 2021
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2021 by the authors
First Published:First published in International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18(9):e4730
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons Licence

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