Association between intimate partner violence and the use of maternal health care services among married Malawian women

Magombo, P. W.,, Ntenda, P. A.M. and Nkoka, O. (2021) Association between intimate partner violence and the use of maternal health care services among married Malawian women. BMC Women's Health, 21, 173. (doi: 10.1186/s12905-021-01312-6) (PMID:33892706) (PMCID:PMC8066443)

[img] Text
239977.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

1MB

Abstract

Background: Maternal and child health care (MCH) services aim at improving the overall health outcomes of both the mother and newborn. Intimate partner violence (IPV) has been linked with poor health outcomes and under usage of MCH services. In Malawi, IPV is a persistent problem, while MCH services’ uptake remains a constant challenge. However, there is limited information on the association between IPV and MCH services in Malawi. The study examined the association between IPV and the use of MCH services among married Malawian women. Methods: The 2015–16 Malawi demographic and health survey was used to analyze the association of IPV and the use of MCH services among 2712 married Malawian women. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to estimate the strength of association. Results: Approximately 41.4% of the women reported experiencing IPV. Specifically, 27.8%, 19.3%, and 23.6% reported experiencing physical, sexual, and emotional violence, respectively. Women who reported experiencing any form of IPV had a 34% reduced likelihood of delivering at a health facility [adjusted odds ratio (aOR): 0.66; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.46–0.96] or were 36% less likely [aOR: 0.64; 95% CI 0.46–0.90] to have had skilled assistance during delivery compared to those who never experienced IPV. Conclusion: IPV was associated with MCH services use, specifically delivery at a health facility and skilled birth attendants. The high prevalence of IPV underscores the need to design effective programs to raise awareness regarding IPV and reduce IPV. Reducing IPV may be a promising means to support a more integrated and sustainable approach to improve the use of MCH services.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Nkoka, Dr Owen
Authors: Magombo, P. W.,, Ntenda, P. A.M., and Nkoka, O.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Public Health
Journal Name:BMC Women's Health
Publisher:BioMed Central
ISSN:1472-6874
ISSN (Online):1472-6874
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2021 The Authors
First Published:First published in BMC Women's Health 21: 173
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

University Staff: Request a correction | Enlighten Editors: Update this record