Diet quality indices, genetic risk and risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality: a longitudinal analysis of 77 004 UK Biobank participants

Livingstone, K. M., Abbott, G., Bowe, S. J., Ward, J. , Milte, C. and McNaughton, S. A. (2021) Diet quality indices, genetic risk and risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality: a longitudinal analysis of 77 004 UK Biobank participants. BMJ Open, 11(4), e045362. (doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2020-045362) (PMID:33795309) (PMCID:PMC8023730)

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Abstract

Objectives: To examine associations of three diet quality indices and a polygenic risk score with incidence of all-cause mortality, cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality, myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke. Design: Prospective cohort study. Setting: UK Biobank, UK. Participants: 77 004 men and women (40–70 years) recruited between 2006 and 2010. Main outcome measures: A polygenic risk score was created from 300 single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with CVD. Cox proportional HRs were used to estimate independent effects of diet quality and genetic risk on all-cause mortality, CVD mortality, MI and stroke risk. Dietary intake (Oxford WebQ) was used to calculate Recommended Food Score (RFS), Healthy Diet Indicator (HDI) and Mediterranean Diet Score (MDS). Results: New all-cause (n=2409) and CVD (n=364) deaths and MI (n=1141) and stroke (n=748) events were identified during mean follow-ups of 7.9 and 7.8 years, respectively. The adjusted HR associated with one-point higher RFS for all-cause mortality was 0.96 (95% CI: 0.94 to 0.98), CVD mortality was 0.94 (95% CI: 0.90 to 0.98), MI was 0.97 (95% CI: 0.95 to 1.00) and stroke was 0.94 (95% CI: 0.91 to 0.98). The adjusted HR for all-cause mortality associated with one-point higher HDI and MDS was 0.97 (95% CI: 0.93 to 0.99) and 0.95 (95% CI: 0.91 to 0.98), respectively. The adjusted HR associated with one-point higher MDS for stroke was 0.93 (95% CI: 0.87 to 1.00). There was little evidence of associations between HDI and risk of CVD mortality, MI or stroke. There was evidence of an interaction between diet quality and genetic risk score for MI. Conclusion: Higher diet quality predicted lower risk of all-cause mortality, independent of genetic risk. Higher RFS was also associated with lower risk of CVD mortality and MI. These findings demonstrate the benefit of following a healthy diet, regardless of genetic risk.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:KL is supported by a National Health and Medical Research Council Emerging Leadership Fellowship (APP1173803). JW is funded by the Lister Prize Fellowship (173096).
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Ward, Dr Joey
Authors: Livingstone, K. M., Abbott, G., Bowe, S. J., Ward, J., Milte, C., and McNaughton, S. A.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Mental Health and Wellbeing
Journal Name:BMJ Open
Publisher:BMJ Publishing Group
ISSN:2044-6055
ISSN (Online):2044-6055
Published Online:01 April 2021
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2021 The Authors
First Published:First published in BMJ Open 11(4): e045362
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
173096Investigating comorbidity between hypertension and bipolar disorder to identify new and repurposed medications for bipolar disorderDaniel SmithLister Institute of Preventive Medicine (LISTININ)Research Prize 2016HW - Mental Health and Wellbeing