Health costs and benefits associated with economic transitions: linking records of address change, property value, and self-reported health

Moriarty, J., Maguire, A., Edgar-Fitzsimons, N. and McCann, M. (2021) Health costs and benefits associated with economic transitions: linking records of address change, property value, and self-reported health. Population, Space and Place, (doi: 10.1002/psp.2466) (Early Online Publication)

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Abstract

Deprivation is a major risk to population health, in particular when experienced during childhood. Poor health in the early years accumulates and is expressed in adult health inequalities. Policy makers may aim to mitigate against the ill effects of deprivation by trying to increase social mobility and facilitating moves towards better earnings and living conditions or by protecting against the effects of downward moves and the experience of deprivation. This paper uses address change and property value data at the individual and family level to examine whether poor health outcomes occur more frequently among people who move between addresses and particularly those who move to properties with lower property values. We use the Northern Ireland Longitudinal Study, linking health and demographic data from 2001 and 2011 Censuses to house valuations for a representative 28% of the population aged 10–64 years (N = 342,681). Young persons (aged 10–15 years) living in a house valued at over £160,000 were half as likely to be reported as having mental ill health as those living in a house valued under £75,000 (OR = 0.49, CI: 0.31–0.78). There was no strong evidence that upward or downward mobility affected mental health or physical health for young people, but ill health of working aged persons showed a strong association with moving to houses of lower value. Results are discussed in terms of their implications for understanding the dynamics of social mobility and health and in terms of how various policies towards poverty may influence population health.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:Mark McCann was supported by Medical Research Council partnership grant MC_PC_13027 and by the MRC and Scotland’s Chief Scientist Office through the SPHSU Complexity (MC_UU_12017/14 / SPHSU14 / MC_UU_00022/1) and relationships (MC_UU_12017/11 / SPHSU11 / MC_UU_00022/3) programmes. John Moriarty, Aideen Maguire and Mark McCann were supported by the ESRC ES/K00428X/1.
Status:Early Online Publication
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:McCann, Dr Mark
Authors: Moriarty, J., Maguire, A., Edgar-Fitzsimons, N., and McCann, M.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > MRC/CSO SPHSU
Journal Name:Population, Space and Place
Publisher:Wiley
ISSN:1544-8444
ISSN (Online):1544-8452
Published Online:02 May 2021
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2021 The Authors
First Published:First published in Population, Space and Place 2021
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License
Data DOI:10.17605/OSF.IO/KJ4N9

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
168560MRC SPHSU/GU Transfer FellowshipsLaurence MooreMedical Research Council (MRC)MC_PC_13027HW - MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit
727661SPHSU Core Renewal: Complexity in Health Improvement Research ProgrammeLaurence MooreMedical Research Council (MRC)MC_UU_12017/14IHW - MRC/CSO SPHU
Complexity in healthMedical Research Council (MRC)MC_UU_00022/1HW - MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit
727631SPHSU Core Renewal: Relationships & Health Improvement Research ProgrammeLisa McDaidMedical Research Council (MRC)MC_UU_12017/11IHW - MRC/CSO SPHU
Relationships and healthMedical Research Council (MRC)MC_UU_00022/3HW - MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit
Chief Scientist Office (CSO)SPHSU11
Chief Scientist Office (CSO)SPHSU14