Exploiting Scanning Surveillance Data to Assess the Impact of Disease Control Initiatives and Inform Future Strategies to Control Endemic Diseases. The Example of Sheep Scab

Geddes, E. , Mohr, S. , Mitchell, S. E., Robertson, S., Brzozowska, A. M., Burgess, S. and Busin, V. (2020) Exploiting Scanning Surveillance Data to Assess the Impact of Disease Control Initiatives and Inform Future Strategies to Control Endemic Diseases. The Example of Sheep Scab. 74th Annual AVTRW Conference, 14-15 September 2020.

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Publisher's URL: http://www.avtrw.co.uk/files/5116/0009/3403/AVTRW_Conference_Proceedings_2020.pdf

Abstract

Scanning surveillance allows us to monitor the occurrence of many endemic diseases in Great Britain (GB), including sheep scab, an ectoparasitic disease of major economic and welfare burden. The Veterinary Investigation Diagnosis Analysis (VIDA) database records diagnoses made by disease surveillance centres in GB and contributes to the scanning surveillance of sheep scab. This study aimed to investigate the use of the VIDA database to assess the impact of disease control initiatives to inform control strategies using a temporal alarm detection algorithm (TADA). A total of 2,401 positive skin scrapes were recorded from 2003-2018. Significant clustering was observed in Wales, with a maximum of 47 positive scrapes in Ceredigion in 2007. Across the study period 11 national disease control initiatives, organised by stakeholders, industry and government occurred: 4 in Wales, 3 in England and 4 in Scotland. The majority (8) offered free diagnostic testing, and the remaining offered knowledge transfer and free testing, skills training and knowledge transfer, and the introduction of the Sheep Scab (Scotland) Order. The TADA raised 20 alarms, of which 11 occurred within a period of free testing in Wales, and 1 at the introduction of the sheep scab order. In summary, this study shows that further use of the VIDA database enhances our knowledge of sheep scab by identifying areas for targeted action and offers a framework to measure the impact of future disease control initiatives. Additionally, this framework could be applied to inform cost-effective and sustainable strategies for the control of other endemic diseases.

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Mohr, Dr Sibylle and Geddes, Eilidh and Busin, Valentina
Authors: Geddes, E., Mohr, S., Mitchell, S. E., Robertson, S., Brzozowska, A. M., Burgess, S., and Busin, V.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Biodiversity Animal Health and Comparative Medicine
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Veterinary Medicine

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