Alpha/beta power decreases during episodic memory formation predict the magnitude of alpha/beta power decreases during subsequent retrieval

Griffiths, B., Martin-Buro, M. C., Staresina, B., Hanslmayr, S. and Staudigl, T. (2021) Alpha/beta power decreases during episodic memory formation predict the magnitude of alpha/beta power decreases during subsequent retrieval. Neuropsychologia, 153, 107755. (doi: 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2021.107755) (PMID:33515568)

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Abstract

Episodic memory retrieval is characterised by the vivid reinstatement of information about a personally-experienced event. Growing evidence suggests that this reinstatement is supported by reductions in the spectral power of alpha/beta activity. Given that the amount of information that can be recalled depends on the amount of information that was originally encoded, information-based accounts of alpha/beta activity would suggest that retrieval-related alpha/beta power decreases similarly depend upon decreases in alpha/beta power during encoding. To test this hypothesis, seventeen human participants completed a sequence-learning task while undergoing concurrent MEG recordings. Regression-based analyses were then used to estimate how alpha/beta power decreases during encoding predicted alpha/beta power decreases during retrieval on a trial-by-trial basis. When subjecting these parameter estimates to group-level analysis, we find evidence to suggest that retrieval-related alpha/beta (7-15Hz) power decreases fluctuate as a function of encoding-related alpha/beta power decreases. These results suggest that retrieval-related alpha/beta power decreases are contingent on the decrease in alpha/beta power that arose during encoding. Subsequent analysis uncovered no evidence to suggest that these alpha/beta power decreases reflect stimulus identity, indicating that the contingency between encoding- and retrieval-related alpha/beta power reflects the reinstatement of a neurophysiological operation, rather than neural representation, during episodic memory retrieval.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:T.S. is funded by the European Research Council (grant no. 802681). S.H. is funded by the European Research Council (grant no. 647954) and the Economic and Social Research Council (ES/R010072/1). B.S. is funded by the Wellcome Trust (107672/Z/15/Z).
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Hanslmayr, Professor Simon
Authors: Griffiths, B., Martin-Buro, M. C., Staresina, B., Hanslmayr, S., and Staudigl, T.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology
Journal Name:Neuropsychologia
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0028-3932
ISSN (Online):1873-3514
Published Online:28 January 2021
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2021 Elsevier Ltd
First Published:First published in Neuropsychologia 153:107755
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the publisher copyright policy

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
647954Code4MemorySimon HanslmayrERCUNSPECIFIED
TIMEESRCUNSPECIFIED